Posts tagged with "Walt Disney World"

Walt Disney World ‘enthusiasts’ say theme park has ‘lost its magic’

September 20, 2022

A majority of “self-described Disney World enthusiasts” say the Florida theme park has “lost its magic” due to skyrocketing costs, according to findings of a recent study, reports Fox Business.

A study from gambling website Time2play surveyed 1,927 “Disney World enthusiasts”—and, of those, 68.3% reported that the price hikes make them feel like the theme park has “lost its magic.” A whopping 92.6% reported that they believe the high costs for the park has made a vacation for the average family “out of reach.”

A ticket for Disney World’s Magic Kingdom in 1971 was a total of $3.50, according to the study. When adjusting for inflation, that would mean tickets would be about $25.60 today. Instead, tickets for one Disney World park range from $109 to $159 per day, according to the findings.

Nearly 50% of respondents reported postponing a trip due to the price hikes.

All in, Disney World veterans can expect to pay 35.7% more for their next trip compared to their last one, Time2play established.

A chart posted to social media last year by a researcher at SJ Data Visualizations, a U.K.-based firm, shows that prices for Disney World have risen by at least 3,871% since 1971—with prices rising at a more drastic rate in the early 1980s compared to its first decade.

Families spoke out about the prices earlier this year, as traveling picked back up following coronavirus lockdowns, and they expressed shock at the price hikes. One dad of two estimated he would be on the hook for a $4,000 to $5,000 bill, even with one of his kids qualifying for free admission.

“I understand inflation and all of those things. I understand cost increases,” Kentucky father Matt Day told The Washington Post earlier this year on the high prices. “I always had the impression that Disney was a family vacation destination, and that impression is why I was surprised to see how expensive it truly was—and how out of reach it is for most American families.”

“It’s really unprecedented,” said Len Testa, president of theme-park trip-planning site Touring Plans told the Post earlier this year. “We haven’t seen this sort of anger about price hikes in—we can’t remember the last time something like this caused this much anger from Disney fans.”

Walt Disney World’s communications team did not immediately respond to Fox’s request for comment on the study.

Research contact: @FoxBusiness

Storyliving is Disney’s new venture into planned residential communities

February 18, 2022

The Walt Disney Company has announced the launch of a new initiative to develop residential communities called Storyliving by Disney, reports Forbes magazine.

According to Disney, the new communities will feature “distinctively designed spaces, unique amenities, and world-renowned service.” The first community is set to be developed in Rancho Mirage, California, and additional locations around the United States are under exploration.

The master-planned communities are intended to, as Disney says, “Inspire residents to foster new friendships, pursue their interests and write the next exciting chapter in their lives—all while enjoying the attention to detail, unique amenities, and special touches that are Disney hallmarks.”

The first location of Rancho Mirage is a nod to Walt Disney, himself; who once owned a home in the area, where he would spend leisure time with his family. It will be called Cotino, a Storyliving by Disney community.

Homebuyers can choose from estates, single-family homes and condominiums to purchase, along with feature neighborhoods for those 55 years old and over.

Rental units are not anticipated to be available. There will be a voluntary club membership through which Disney will provide access to a variety of curated experiences, entertainment, and philanthropic endeavors. Each location within the community will be operated by Disney Cast Members.

 Disney also has announced that Cotino will have a mixed-use district with shopping, dining, and entertainment. A beachfront hotel and beach park will also be available. The hotel and park will also be able to be accessed by the public with a purchase of a day pass.

Cotino is being developed in collaboration with DMB Development of Scottsdale, Arizona, which is widely known for its execution of planned communities. “Cotino represents the creativity and operational excellence of Disney combined with the extensive community development expertise of DMB Development. We are delighted to collaborate with Disney in this groundbreaking new concept,” said Brent Herrington, CEO of DMB Development.

“As we prepare to enter our second century, we are developing new and exciting ways to bring the magic of Disney to people wherever they are, expanding storytelling to storyliving. We can’t wait to welcome residents to these beautiful and unique Disney communities where they can live their lives to the fullest,” said Josh D’Amaro, chairman, Disney Parks, Experiences and Products in a press release.

Storyliving by Disney isn’t the company’s first dip into the world of real estate and community development. According to Click Orlando, Disney announced plans for Celebration to the public in 1991 and broke ground in 1994. The master-planned community had plenty of homes, schools, shopping, and dining. However, Disney ultimately let go of Celebration in 2004 and sold it to private investors.

Those with millions of dollars to spend and a love for Disney can also live in the private, ultra-luxe neighborhood of Golden Oak set in the heart of Walt Disney World. Prices start at $2 million and go upwards, to well over $10 million for a home in the desirable neighborhood.

Research contact: @Forbes

Workers reveal Disney is using ‘Mickey Mouse’ pandemic rules, covering up its COVID cases

September 8, 2020

In early July, the Walt Disney Company reopened parts of two amusement parks— Walt Disney World near Orlando, Florida; and Disneyland in Anaheim, California. Although they reopened within days of each other, the two parks worked with wildly different resources—and, employees have told The Daily Beast on the lowdown, disturbingly different results.

Disney World reopened to house the tightly controlled 13-week experiment known as the NBA Bubble, in which staff, players, coaches, and personnel adhered to strict social distancing guidelines and isolation requirements, paired with regular on-site testing. By contrast, Disneyland welcomed back its workers with less grandiosity—opening up a sprawling outdoor shopping district called Downtown Disney, with a select staff of several hundred.

Unlike the Bubble, the Downtown Disney district had no on-site testing. In a letter to the unions in June, Disney Labor Relations Director Bill Pace called testing “not viable” and prone to “false negatives,” in spite of the fact that it has been implemented in Orlando.

Likewise, the district did not contain its visitors, but allowed streams of thousands to pass in and out of the area with little more than a temperature check. But the most alarming difference, cast members told The Daily Beast, involved the district’s shadowy contact tracing. 

Four sources familiar with the matter told The Daily Beast that Disney has kept the total number of positive cases at the district under wraps.

Indeed, sources say,  that Disney has alerted unions only to the positive test results of their members—often days after the fact, risking further exposure—and leaving workers to guess for themselves why colleagues disappeared for days at a time. (Or why 11 people from the 12-person Horticulture Irrigation team didn’t show up to work for a full week.)

“We want to know if any cast members have tested positive. But Disney has taken the position that they’re only going to tell us if our cast members do,” Matt Bell, a spokesperson for UFCW Local 324, one of a dozen unions representing workers, or “cast members,” at Disneyland, told The Daily Beast in an interview. “What is supposed to happen is contact tracing—find out who was exposed and quarantine them as well. I can’t confirm that they’ve done that.”

“Basically all of our COVID information has come from word of mouth,” said Alicia*, the spouse of a cast member whose contract prohibits them from speaking to the press, “co-workers texting each other, co-workers talking to each other, and things that my [spouse] has seen on the job. None of this is from any of the managers. Disney management is not really officially acknowledging that any of this is happening.”

Disney did not respond to more than eight requests for comment.

Matt*, who requested anonymity out of fear for his job, has worked at Disney for four years as a plumber. Back in March, he was furloughed with the vast majority of Disney’s workers, cashing out vacation days to make ends meet. When Disney recalled workers to reopen parts of the park in late June, Matt was not too concerned. He worked outside mostly, often alone. The job already required wearing a mask and latex gloves, because of the pesticides in Disney’s soil. “It looks pretty,” he said, “but it’s a bunch of chemicals.”

The first week back, two sources familiar with the situation told The Daily Beast, one gardener went home sick. He had come back to work, only to find—after getting tested on his own time—that he had caught the virus from a relative. Two sources told The Daily Beast that Disney did not confirm the positive case until the following Monday, letting a week lapse before his co-workers knew they may have been exposed. Representatives for the workers’ union, LiUNA Local 652, did not respond to requests for comment.

Alicia did not have faith in Disney’s ability to pull off a safe reopening without regular on-site testing, touch-free temperature and bag checks, and a strict contact-tracing protocol—especially in a moment when Orange County was seeing a spike in positive cases. On July 8, ten days after the cast members returned to work and one day before the district opened, she wrote messages to both the City of Anaheim and California Governor Gavin Newsom, flagging the danger on behalf of several cast members. “Unknowingly, [the cast members were] working next to an employee who was exposed to COVID-19,” she wrote. “Although the Union urged him to not return, he still worked his entire shift, thus exposing ALL of [them].” 

“NO ONE,” she concluded, “‘needs’ to ride Dumbo during a plague!”

The governor never got back, but the City of Anaheim responded. “We’re sorry to hear of what you shared,” they wrote, according to messages reviewed by The Daily Beast. The next day, however, the city posted on its Facebook page about Downtown Disney, celebrating the district’s reopening “in a safe and responsible way.” Downtown Disney, they noted, is “a major generator of sales tax revenue.” 

“We understand the concerns of anyone working or going back to work,” Chief Communications Officer for the City of Anaheim Mike Lyster told The Daily Beast. “But we are unaware of any concerns at Downtown Disney.”

Workers disappear; word-of-mouth indicates COVID

From there, Alicia said, more workers began to disappear. In an extensive thread of text messages sent between late July and mid August, all of which were reviewed by The Daily Beast, three workers discussed positive cases on the Horticulture Irrigation team and their fear of going into work.

On July 23, one worker told another about two sick members of their team, one of whom tested positive, the other of whom was waiting on test results. The other worker responded with word that two machinists and a roofer on another team had also gone home sick. The following day, they discussed a third gardener who had gone home ill. On July 26, one cast member, Wilson (not his real name) confided that he had tested positive for COVID himself; his wife would get the same result four days later.

By July 27, according to the messages, six of the 12 members of their team were home sick or isolating. By July 29, that number had grown to nine.

On Aug.ust2, Wilson alleged in a text message that just five days after he tested positive for COVID-19, Disney had cleared him to return to work. At this point, Wilson claimed he had not isolated the recommended 14 days, nor received a negative test result. Nevertheless, he wrote, he returned to work on August 3. The following day, according to the text messages, two more members of the 12-person team had reportedly gone home, leaving just Wilson and one other worker.

Throughout this time, The Daily Beast reports, fear was escalating among the workforce. On behalf of her spouse, Alicia sent five messages to Governor Newsom’s office, to all of his social media accounts, and through his online comment portal.

“In addition to [Disney’s] unscrupulous suppression of their COVID-19 case numbers, they have ‘highly encouraged/recommended’ employees to not anger ANY customer in Downtown Disney,” Alicia wrote. “Regardless of the new safety rules, so long as the customer is wearing a mask, [cast members] are discouraged from ‘ruffling feathers,’ meaning social distancing enforcement has become fairly scattershot at best.”

Her messages were not returned–nor were further steps taken to protect either the workers or the park visitors.

The question at this point is, are those who return to Disney, either for work or play, “being taken for a ride”—and not the popular type, like Thunder Mountain?

Research source: @thedailybeast