Posts tagged with "Princess Diana"

Will ‘The Crown’ address Queen Elizabeth’s death?

September 14, 2022

Queen Elizabeth II died peacefully on Sepember 8  at the age of 96 at Balmoral Castle in Scotland, her family verified in a statement. “The King and The Queen Consort will remain at Balmoral this evening and will return to London tomorrow,” the announcement revealed, reports Bustle.

The news led to an outpouring of responses from royals, celebrities, and “man-on- the-street interviews” around the world.

But, if you got to know the royal family (as many viewers did) through the Emmy-winning Netflix series, The Crown, you may be wondering: How the popular series will deal with the Queen’s death?

The show doesn’t claim to be a completely accurate retelling of Queen Elizabeth II and her family’s lives, of course. A Netflix spokesperson once told Variety it’s “a work of fiction that’s broadly based on historical events.” But it does try to get close with the help of “a dozen exceptionally bright researchers, script editors, and historians,” showrunner Peter Morgan told The Hollywood Reporter.

In other words, an event as significant as Queen Elizabeth II’s death would definitely be explored in detail by The Crown — if the show had plans to cover this portion of history, that is. However, Morgan never intended for The Crown to get so close to the modern era. “I try to keep focused on history and not the present day,” he told The Hollywood Reporter. “I like to make sure there is at least a generation between the events I’m writing about and what’s going on all around me.”

The Crown, Season 5, which is scheduled to debut in November, will reportedly include the death of Princess Diana in 1997— and Season 6 will reach as far as the early aughts, according to Deadline. The sixth and final season “will not bring us any closer to present day,” Morgan reiterated to the outlet. “It will simply enable us to cover the same period in greater detail.”

While you can be sure that Morgan isn’t rushing to make any edits or script changes, The Crown may still be affected by Queen Elizabeth II’s death in a major way. A source recently told The New York Post that the show has its “own version of Operation London Bridge”—referencing the protocol (which was discussed in The Crown) of what should happen after the monarch dies.

“This is particularly pertinent for if we are filming,” the source added. “Filming will shut down immediately if we are in production, for at least a week. There would also be lots of discussion about when to restart.”

This indeed seems to be the plan for filming Season 6, as Morgan told Deadline in a September 8 email. The Crown is a love letter to her and I’ve nothing to add for now, just silence and respect,” he wrote. “I expect we will stop filming out of respect too.”

Even though Season 5 is just two months away, The Crown’s reported Operation London Bridge could feasibly include other changes, too, like postponing the season premiere out of respect for the royal family. It wouldn’t be the first time a project related to the royals has been pushed back for this reason.

Last year, for example, Netflix indefinitely postponed the premiere of the UK Channel 5 documentary, Diana: The Interview That Shocked The World, following the death of Prince Philip —and today, the doc is not streaming on Netflix. Granted, this was not a Netflix original like The Crown is, but it still shows that the streamer treads carefully when the royal family is involved.

Research contact: @bustle

Princes William and Harry reunite for unveiling of statue of their mother, ‘People’s Princess’ Diana

July 2, 2021

Britain’s Prince William and Prince Harry reunited on July 1 to unveil a statue of their mother, Princess Diana, outside the palace she once called home on the occasion of what would have been her 60th birthday, NBC News reports.

Yet, for many, catching a glimpse of the statue in the gardens of her former home in London’s Kensington Palace, took second place to looking for clues about the state of the relationship between the two royal brothers.

Reports of a rift between the siblings have swirled in the British press since 2018, and Harry has previously said that he and William had “been through hell together,” but were now on “different paths.”

It was only the second time the brothers have been seen together in public since Harry and his wife, Meghan, stepped back from their roles as senior royals last year. Harry’s last visit to the United Kingdom was in April for the funeral of his grandfather, Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh, who died at age 99.

Like-minded in their grief for their mother, who was killed in a Paris car crash in 1997, the brothers unveiled the figure of Diana, which showed her surrounded by three children who represent “the universality and generational impact of the princess’ work,” Kensington Palace said in a statement.

“The statue aims to reflect the warmth, elegance, and energy of Diana,” the Palace added.

Beneath the statue is a plinth engraved with her name and the date of the unveiling and a paving stone with lines of poetry.

The brothers commissioned British sculptor Ian Rank-Broadley to undertake the project. His effigy of Queen Elizabeth II already appears on British coins.

Today, on what would have been our mother’s 60th birthday, we remember her love, strength, and character—qualities that made her a force for good around the world, changing countless lives for the better,” William and Harry said in a rare joint statement.

“Every day, we wish she were still with us, and our hope is that this statue will be seen forever as a symbol of her life and her legacy.”

Harry, Duke of Sussex, and William, Duke of Cambridge, were joined at the unveiling by Diana’s siblings, Earl Spencer, Lady Sarah McCorquodale, and Lady Jane Fellowes, along with other close family members. The statue’s sculptor and the garden’s designer were also in attendance.

Outside, fans lined up with flowers, signs, birthday balloons and flags.

According to NBc News, the statue was placed in the area known as the Sunken Garden, one of Diana’s favorite locations, according to Kensington Palace. It’s also where Harry and Meghan posed for photos after their engagement in November 2017.

The garden was recently redesigned and replanted with 4,000 flowers—including roses, lavender and forget-me-nots, the palace said in a statement.

Diana lived at Kensington Palace during and after her tumultuous marriage to Prince Charles, and raised William and Harry there. It is now home to William’s family.

The brothers commissioned the statue of their mother in 2017 to mark the 20th anniversary of her death. However, it’s far from the only way they have invoked her memory.

Since his departure from the U.K., Harry often has called on his mother’s legacy. He displayed a photo of himself as a child on his mother’s shoulders prominently on his Archewell website, saying that he is “his mother’s son” and stated in a recent Apple TV+ documentary “The Me You Can’t See” that his mother would be proud of him “living the life she wanted for herself.”

Meanwhile, in May, William made a rare emotional statement following a BBC investigation that found the journalist Martin Bashir had used “deceitful behavior” to secure a landmark interview with Diana in 1995—wherein she famously said “there were three of us in this marriage,” referring to Camilla Parker Bowles, who would go on to marry Charles in 2005.

William and Harry’s father, Charles, the heir to the throne, did not join them at the event Thursday, nor did their wives.

The sculptor, Ian Rank-Broadley said: “Diana, Princess of Wales was an icon who touched the lives of people right around the world, so it has been a privilege to work alongside Prince William and Prince Harry on this statue which commemorates her life.

Research contact: @NBCNews

Belief in conspiracy theories is tied to vaccine skepticism

February 9, 2018

People who believe that Princess Diana was murdered in 1997 or that President John F. Kennedy’s assassination in 1963 was part of an elaborate plot are more likely to think that vaccines are unsafe, despite scientific evidence to the contrary, according to findings of an online survey of over 5,000 people from 24 countries covered by Homeland Security News on February 2.

The study is the first to test the relationship between conspiracy beliefs and anti-vaccination attitudes among a global sample, according to lead researcher Matthew Hornsey, a faculty member in the Psychology Department at the University of Queensland in Australia.

 The research (“The Psychological Roots of Anti-Vaccination Attitudes: A 24-Nation Investigation”) was published in the journal, Health Psychology, on February 1.

“People often develop attitudes through emotional and gut responses,” Hornsey explained. “Simply repeating evidence makes little difference to those who have anti-vaccination attitudes.”

Indeed, as of January 12, more than 152 million doses of flu vaccine had been shipped nationwide, according to the Centers for Disease Control (CDC). However, many still hesitated to take the shot.

The researchers measured anti-vaccination attitudes versus beliefs in four conspiracy theories: that Princess Diana was murdered; that the American government knew about the 9/11 attacks in advance and chose to let them happen; that a shadowy group of elites are colluding on a new world order; and that John F. Kennedy was murdered as part of wide-ranging, intricate plot.

Among the results: Those with strong beliefs in conspiracies were most likely to hold anti-vaccination attitudes— regardless of where they lived. For example, the more strongly respondents believed that Princess Diana was murdered, the more negative attitudes they had about vaccinations. In contrast, level of education had a very small impact on anti-vaccination attitudes.

Large pharmaceutical companies, which profit from selling vaccines, are often targets for conspiracy theorists, said Hornsey. “For many conspiracy theorists, profits gained are a sign that the system is broken and the truth is being covered up by vested interests.”

Anti-vaccination attitudes also were associated with intolerance of those whom respondents believe limit their freedom, disgust toward blood and needles and an individualistic world view, according to the study.

Research contact: m.hornsey@psy.uq.edu.au