Posts tagged with "OnePoll"

This is the best snuggle buddy, according to new research

May 10, 2022

Six in ten people would rather snuggle up to their pet than to a partner, new research suggests. In fact, a recent survey of 2,000 pet owners found that 61% would prefer to share their couch or bed with their pet than with their significant other, reports, SWNS.

The reason? Two-thirds said their pet is usually a cleaner and quieter companion.

Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of  Lovesac  ahead of National Comfy Day last February 20, the survey also found that four in ten  reported a higher quality of sleep when sharing their sofa or bed with their pet, likely because their fur pal doesn’t wake up to use the bathroom (59%) or disturb their slumber by snoring (53%).

The poll also hinted at a nation divided—with half saying they’d never allow their pet on their couch. However, 77% of people would reconsider with older couches, and 65% would do so if their couch had washable covers.

It’s important to consider the needs of everyone in the household, including your pets, but this can be challenging when it comes to furniture,” said Shawn Nelson, Lovesac’s CEO and founder. “Choosing a durable couch with machine-washable covers and replaceable cushions will save you a lot of time worrying about potential repairs or tough stains.”

Respondents also noted that their pets seem to get better sleep than they do, especially dogs (75% vs. 65% of cats). Half (51%) of pets forgo their regular bed in favor of a carpet or rug, while 37% nap on a table. Twenty-nine percent of fur pals have also gotten cozy on the laundry.

And people sometimes do the same. In fact, about as many people (30%) have used laundry as a bed. While 51% have slept or napped on their couch, others admitted to catching some Zs in more unconventional places, including a carpet or rug (44%), and a table or desk (36%).

Overall, the average respondent spends 41 minutes a week sleeping or napping somewhere other than their bed, most commonly their couch, with more than half saying that’s their preferred napping spot.

More than half (52%) of respondents say their pet has damaged their couch and 69% of those were forced to throw it away due to the damage.

What makes a couch more comfortable than other pieces of furniture? Having an ideal level of softness (34%) and an optimal height (23%), according to most respondents.

The most popular things to do on a couch include watching TVs and movies (98%) followed closely by napping or relaxing (96%).

“A good couch should be washable, changeable and rearrangeable so that you can relax, nap or catch up on our favorite series without worry.” Nelson added. “That’s what comfort is all about.”
Research contact: @SWNS

Coffee, tea, or water? Here’s what your go-to daily drink says about you

March 24, 2022

If a midday slump has you reaching for a pick-me-up, you might want to think twice before choosing coffee. A recent survey of 2,005 Americans focused on people’s beverage choices—and found that, while coffee lovers undoubtedly have the most drive in the morning (65%), only 29% sustain the same level of motivation going into the afternoon, reports Study Finds.

Meanwhile, 41% of those who favor tea claim they retain the same level of get-up-and-go after lunch. What’s more, people who prefer juice (81%) and water (78%) claim to remain productive throughout the day.

As an added benefit, those who mainly drink water also get the best sleep, as 60% say they get between six and eight hours of rest every night, compared to just 42% of those who mainly sip coffee.

Conducted by OnePoll on behalf of the tea brand, Celestial Seasonings, the survey also examined personality differences between coffee and non-coffee drinkers—uncovering that there’s a lot you can learn about someone based on what’s on their cup.

Here’s what your beverage of choice is saying about you:

  • Tea is now a popular choiceamong millennials, who comprise 60% of all Americans who prefer tea. More than one-third (34%) say they turn to tea every day.
  • People who primarily drink water over other beverages say they have lower levels of anxiety and stress (61%).
  • Those who favor tea or coffee are most likely to prioritize their overall health. Indeed, nearly all tea drinkers (93%) place high importance on their health. While 92% of coffee lovers say the same thing, nearly 40% report that their mental health is constantly weighed down by feelings of anxiety or stress (38%). Only 25% of tea drinkers say that they experience those same negative feelings.
  • Twenty-three percent of all respondents also add that tea is their beverage of choice when they want to unwind.

“Tea is having a big moment. We’re seeing a record number of consumers across age groups reach for tea because of its health advantages,” says Tim Collins, VP and general manager for Celestial Seasonings. “More fans help create more innovations like new energy teas and teas with added health benefits like melatonin and probiotics—even a new iced tea cold brew—that are giving coffee a run for its money.”

While 38% turn to energy drinks when they need a pick-me-up, the same number (38%) grab a cup of tea or coffee when they need to re-energize.

That, along with the numerous health benefits, may be the reason why roughly one in five (18%) prefer to start their morning with a cup of tea.

“Whether we’re returning to the office or working from home, we want to feel productive and energized,” Collins continues. “Millennials polled say a simple switch from coffee to tea has the potential to not only sustain that productivity, but also provide multiple benefits.”

Research contact: @StudyFinds

60% ‘couldn’t cope’ without smartphone for a day; 55% think ebbing battery is ‘nightmare scenario’

February 24, 2022

Does it feel like your smartphone never leaves your hand? You’re not alone. A new survey has found that six out of ten people “couldn’t cope” with being separated from their mobile phone for more than a day, reports Study Finds.

The survey—commissioned by HMD Global, the home of Nokia phones, and conducted by OnePoll —found  that 55% of respondents believe running out of battery power is a “nightmare scenario.” One in eight people claim that a dying battery actually gives them anxiety.

“Smartphones offer so much, it’s unsurprising that we’re dependent, making the common complaints around battery life a real issue,” says Petri Hayrynen of HMD Global.

“There are other ways we can preserve our phone battery and offset that angst,” Hayrynen adds. “From using network connections selectively to muting unnecessary sounds and stopping apps from running in the background, these all help the cause and keep you switched on for longer.”

Surprisingly, the poll of 2,000 smartphone users found that only 30% of respondents never leave their house without their phone. When they do bring their phones along, however, most people are completely dependent on them for help.

Two in three (68%) rely on their phones to take photos, while 64% use their phones to check the time, and 62% are constantly looking up weather forecasts. Another 13% confess they can’t even find their way to work without a phone showing them a map!

And speaking of traveling, 27% of respondents admit they’re completely reliant on their smartphone for directions. One in three add they’ve never used a printed map in their lives.

Finally, when it comes to what’s most important to people these days, the poll finds nothing would be more upsetting than losing a smartphone. Nearly half the survey (48%) say it would be very upsetting if they lost their phone. That’s more than the number who would stress out over losing their bank card (46%), their car keys (40%), or even their wedding ring (25%).

Overall, the average respondent checks his or her mobile device 20 times a day. Respondents also spend two full hours looking at their phone screen over a 24-hour period.

Research contact: @StudyFinds

Sibling rivalry: 1 in 2 adults still argues and competes with brothers and sisters

February 18, 2022

Sibling rivalries are common among children, but a new survey finds that most people continue to measure themselves against their brothers and sisters well into adulthood, reports Study Finds.

A poll of 2,000 adults who have at least one sibling— conducted by OnePoll and commissioned by NOW— has found that 51% still have a competitive relationship with their brothers and sisters. Many can’t help but compete over career goals (26%) and even home ownership (22%).

Meanwhile, another 20% still argue over who is their parent’s “favorite” in the family. The same percentage constantly strive to outdo their sibling in the kitchen.

Other areas brothers and sisters keep battling over include their vacation destinations, who drives a nicer car, and their skills as a parent.

For many adults, this is nothing new. Just under one in five (17%) report they’ve had a rivalry with their siblings at every stage of their lives. Interestingly, though, even more (43%) believe this competition heightens each year around big gift-giving holidays like birthdays and Mother’s Day.

The survey also has found that older siblings tend to be both more competitive and more successful. Notably older sisters are even more competitive than older brothers. In fact, 15% told researchers that they’re sibling rivalry  motivated them to achieve more in their careers, with 23% actually achieving that goal.

“Sibling rivalry never goes away, with many of us competing with our brothers or sisters long after we have left home,” Jamie Schwartz from NOW says in a statement.

On average, siblings usually argue twice a month over things such as politics or what to watch on TV. One-third admit that they’ve stopped talking to a brother or sister for a period of time over a disagreement.

For what it’s worth, 25% of respondents believe competition is a healthy aspect of any sibling relationship. Nearly 20% believe their personal sibling rivalries have helped them achieve more in life.

Research contact: @StudyFinds

Most Americans say they’re banning unvaccinated family members from holiday gatherings

November 15, 2021

The holidays are about to get heated. Nearly two-thirds of vaccinated Americans have banned unvaccinated family members from their holiday gatherings this year, according to findings of a new poll, reports SWNS.

A survey of 2,000 U.S. residents—conducted by OnePoll on November 2—examined how the COVID-19 vaccine has impacted people’s relationships with their loved ones ahead of the holidays this year.

Based on the results, nearly seven in 10 respondents (67%) said they feel they cannot go home for the holidays without getting vaccinated first. 

Of the 65% who are fully vaccinated, 6 in 10 (58%) have reportedly cut off family members who refuse to get vaccinated, while 63% don’t feel comfortable inviting unvaccinated relatives to their parties.

Seventy-two percent of vaccinated respondents don’t think they could ever get some of these family members to understand the importance of the vaccine.

In fact, 14% of survey respondents don’t plan to ever get the shot themselves.

When asked about their decision, one respondent shared that they “don’t trust the vaccine is safe,” while another said they were “concerned about side effects.”

One even admitted believing the vaccine “was rushed and people who are getting vaccinated are still getting sick.”

Half of unvaccinated respondents (49%) have stopped communicating with family members who don’t understand why they refuse the shot.

These strained family dynamics may explain why 22% of unvaccinated respondents have so far been excluded from all family gatherings, including the holidays.

However, 38% of unvaccinated people said they remain in contact with their vaccinated loved ones, and 58% of the same group added that they’re still welcome at family get-togethers.

Research contact: @SWNS

Top dog: Americans trust their pets’ judgment when it comes to romantic partners

November 12, 2021

Two in every three Americans would end their current romantic relationship, if their pet disapproves, according to new research reported on by SWNS Digital.

In  survey of 2,000 single and dating Americans conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Zesty Paws, researchers found that 68% said their pet has the final say in whom they date.

Indeed, 71% of respondents said they trust their pet’s judgment over their own. Likewise, 68% trust their pets more than their friends and 67% trust them more than their own family.

In the same study, nearly 7 in 10 Americans (69%) said they had dated someone their pet didn’t like. Luckily, 69% of those who have had their pets reject their dates said their pets liked their next partner.

Sixty-seven percent can thank their pet for scoring the first date with a potential partner or their current partner. But if the first date and meeting of the pet doesn’t go well, 68% said there’s no chance of a second date.

Respondents gave varying reasons for their pet’s distaste for their current or ex-partner—including not liking their scent, height, or lack of attention.

The most obvious signs a pet doesn’t like potential partners include not going near them (47%), clawing/biting them (41%), and growling/hissing at them (40%). And if a potential partner is rude towards a pet, 64% of respondents said they could never forgive them

In order to be liked by a pet, respondents said their partner needs to be friendly (44%), give behind-the-ear scratches (40%), and give treats (38%).

Research contact: @SWNS

A new color scale depicting five distinct shades of ‘yellow’ tells us when we need to hydrate

April 27, 2021

A new color scale has been created with five different shades of  “yellow,” each of which indicates whether we are properly hydrated or not, SWNS Digital reports.

Color experts from the Carlstadt, New Jersey-based Pantone Color Institute have teamed up with London nutritionist Lily Soutter and Scottish bottled water supplier Highland Spring to create the ‘shades of pee’ visual to highlight the importance of hydration.

The five shades of yellow have names such as “Dry Spell” for the darkest shade and “Spring In Your Step”for the lightest. The in-between shades are aptly called “Feeling Good.” “Glass Half Full.” and “You’re At Amber.”

The guide is unveiled to mark Highland Spring’s new 10-litre (338 fluid ounce) hydration pack going on sale, and comes after a study of 2,000 adults found 40%r cent are confused about how much water they should be drinking.

Despite believing they should be consuming seven glasses of water a day, people typically have five—although 23% just manage to drink one to two.

Nutritionist Lily Soutter points to the NHS advice on the health benefits of proper hydration and said: “Drinking enough fluids and staying hydrated throughout the day is important for energy, concentration, mood, and even exercise performance.”

But 43% of respondents said they do not think they are getting enough—because they simply forget to drink water (63%), get distracted by their day-to-day routine (42 %), or are too busy (15%), SWNS Digital reports.

Carol Saunders, spokesperson for Highland Spring said: “Our bodies have a built-in and natural way of helping us to know if we are drinking enough fluids. We know it can be embarrassing to talk about our pee, but it’s an important indicator to help us stay hydrated.

“So we’ve partnered with Pantone Color Institute to kick start that conversation, because for many of us, drinking enough fluids is the first step to feeling more like our natural selves in any self-care routine.”

The study also found people are likely to drink more water if the weather is warmer (33%), if they cut back on other beverages such as coffee (27%) , or if they set reminders (21%).

And almost a 25% of adults track how much they drink throughout the day, by using an app (26%), writing it down (22%), or using the measurements marked on a bottle (27%).

However,  more than 50% of respondents do not take a bottle of water with them when they leave the house and 23% of desk workers admit that they do not keep a drink at their desk.

One in 10 of those polled via international research firm OnePoll do not even have a drink when they exercise and 14%  do not have one with a meal.

Side effects people have experienced from not staying hydrated enough included a dry mouth (46%), dark urine (43%), and fatigue (26%).

Whereas the benefits adults have enjoyed from keeping on top of their water consumption were found to be clearer skin (25%), feeling more active (22%), and reduced cravings for snacks (18%).

Laurie Pressman, vice president of the Pantone Color Institute, said: “Eating right and drinking proper amounts of water are critical contributors to taking care of our personal health and our overall well-being.

“Being able to collaborate with Highland Spring and their expert nutrition partner Lily Soutter to create a color flow chart illustrating the relationship between urine color and hydration levels highlights how the visual language of color can be used as an indicator to provide quick and natural insights as to whether we are keeping ourselves healthfully hydrated.”

Research contact: @SWNS

‘Thirst’ aid: Does drinking lots of water lead to happiness and health?

December 24, 2020

Does being properly hydrated have a transcendent effect on our lives? A new survey of 2,000 Americans has found that those of us who drink six or more glasses of water daily tend to be more optimistic, energetic, and successful, according to a report by Good News Network.

Indeed, the poll—conducted by OnePoll on behalf of Bosch Home Appliances—established that people who drink a half dozen or more glasses of water per day are the most likely to strongly agree that they are “very happy” (41%).

Compare that to those who self-report drinking less than one glass per day: Only 12% strongly agree with that same statement.

What’s more, 40% of those who drink six or optimistic by nature, compared to just 10% of those who drink less than one glass of water a day.

Refreshment also could be the key to waking up feeling refreshed. The study found that those who drink six or more glasses woke up feeling exhausted fewer times each week (2.59) than those who drink less than one glass of water a day (3.14).

Research contact: @goodnewsnetwork

The ‘eyes’ have it: How to read facial expressions when they are obscured by a mask

November 24, 2020

In a recent study, commissioned by York, England-based Vision Direct, fully 76 % of Brits struggled to read the moods of others who were wearing protective face coverings—with more than half misinterpreting their conversational partner’s expressions and feelings completely.

Indeed, the survey of 2,000 Brits—conducted on behalf of Vision Direct by OnePoll—found that:

  • More than two-thirds of adults struggle to see how someone is feeling when they have a mask on;
  • More than 60% of adults admit to misunderstanding what someone was saying when they had a mask on, with 42% putting this down to not being able to see their lips.
  • About 70% now are consciously trying to look at people’s eyes to guess what expression they are hiding behind the mask.

Now, UK-based body language expert and TV personality Judi James has revealed her top tips—and not surprisingly, it is all in the eyes, SWNS Digital reports.

James says, “The human animal has always depended on facial expression as a way of social and workplace communication and, over the years, the key focus has been the mouth. We have come to depend on this widening of the lips as a rapport-building social shorthand, which is why the wearing of face masks has caused worries in terms of closing down our ability to communicate.

“The good news,” she notes, “is that our eyes are more than capable of taking over the job of transmitting and reading non-verbal signals, in fact one of the reasons we tend to direct attention to our mouths is that our eyes are such strong (and more honest) conveyors of moods and emotions.”

She indicates a genuine-looking eye-smile should involve some wrinkling at the corners and the rounding of the cheeks.

An “eye-flash”—during which the eyes narrow in the eye-smile but the brows pop up and down again in one rapid movement—can signify that someone is flirting and “likes what they see.”

While a rounding of the eyes suggests shared excitement and those who are in love will have dilated pupils—giving true meaning to the ‘look of love’.

But not all eye-signs are indicators of happy: As James points out, there are tell-tale signs of someone feeling disgusted or angry. To recognize disgust on the face of someone wearing a mask, you should look out for a puckered frown, narrowed eye shape, and a wrinkling of the skin at the bridge of the nose.

Similarly, anger is typically displayed with knitted brows that come as low as possible over the eyes, plus a hard eye-stare with the eyes slightly rounded. The head would be tilted slightly forward too.

What’s more, James cautions that reading other’s eye expressions is important but we also need to be aware of our own. “Our ‘resting’ faces can make us look miserable and unapproachable and without all those mouth shrugs or grins in our repertoire we need to make an active effort to use our eyes to transmit friendly smiles and expressions of empathy.”

Following the findings, Vision Direct has created a quiz to test the nation on its ability to recognize key everyday expressions—via the eyes.

To take the quiz visit www.visiondirect.co.uk/facial-expressions-under-the-face-mask

Research contact: @SWNS

The ‘eyes’ have it: How to read facial expressions when they are obscured by a mask

November 24, 2020

In a recent study, commissioned by York, England-based Vision Direct, fully 76 % of Brits struggled to read the moods of others who were wearing protective face coverings—with more than half misinterpreting their conversational partner’s expressions and feelings completely.

Indeed, the survey of 2,000 Brits—conducted on behalf of Vision Direct by OnePoll—found that:

  • More than two-thirds of adults struggle to see how someone is feeling when they have a mask on;
  • More than 60% of adults admit to misunderstanding what someone was saying when they had a mask on, with 42% putting this down to not being able to see their lips.
  • About 70% now are consciously trying to look at people’s eyes to guess what expression they are hiding behind the mask.

Now, UK-based body language expert and TV personality Judi James has revealed her top tips—and not surprisingly, it is all in the eyes, SWNS Digital reports.

James says, “The human animal has always depended on facial expression as a way of social and workplace communication and, over the years, the key focus has been the mouth. We have come to depend on this widening of the lips as a rapport-building social shorthand, which is why the wearing of face masks has caused worries in terms of closing down our ability to communicate.

“The good news,” she notes, “is that our eyes are more than capable of taking over the job of transmitting and reading non-verbal signals, in fact one of the reasons we tend to direct attention to our mouths is that our eyes are such strong (and more honest) conveyors of moods and emotions.”

She indicates a genuine-looking eye-smile should involve some wrinkling at the corners and the rounding of the cheeks.

An “eye-flash”—during which the eyes narrow in the eye-smile but the brows pop up and down again in one rapid movement— can signify that someone is flirting and “likes what they see.”

While a rounding of the eyes suggests shared excitement and those who are in love will have dilated pupils – giving true meaning to the ‘look of love’.

But not all eye-signs are indicators of happy: As James points out, there are tell-tale signs of someone feeling disgusted or angry. To recognize disgust on the face of someone wearing a mask, you should look out for a puckered frown, narrowed eye shape, and a wrinkling of the skin at the bridge of the nose.

Similarly, anger is typically displayed with knitted brows that come as low as possible over the eyes, plus a hard eye-stare with the eyes slightly rounded. The head would be tilted slightly forward too.

What’s more, James cautions that reading other’s eye expressions is important but we also need to be aware of our own. “Our ‘resting’ faces can make us look miserable and unapproachable and without all those mouth shrugs or grins in our repertoire we need to make an active effort to use our eyes to transmit friendly smiles and expressions of empathy.”

Following the findings, Vision Direct has created a quiz to test the nation on its ability to recognize key everyday expressions—via the eyes.

To take the quiz visit www.visiondirect.co.uk/facial-expressions-under-the-face-mask

Research contact: @SWNS