Posts tagged with "New York Post"

Follow the yellow brick road: Have scientists found an undersea path to the lost city of Atlantis?

May 12, 2022

Not every road leads to Rome. Some paths appear to be headed to the very heart of the ocean—like the one recently spotted by scientists in the Pacific, which they dubbed the “road to Atlantis,” reports the New York Post.

Late last month, oceanographers aboard the E/V Nautilus vessel were out exploring the floor of the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument—a submarine range of volcanic mountains off the coast of Hawaii—when they came across what looked like a well-preserved brick road on the ocean floor.

On April 29, the researchers were amazed to see such a structure 3,376 feet underwater, near the top of Nootka Seamount. The discovery, as part of the Luʻuaeaahikiikekumu expedition, was captured on video during the group’s 24/7 livestream on YouTube.

“It’s the road to Atlantis,” one scientist is heard saying in the background of the footage.

“That’s a really unique structure,” another added.

“This is the yellow brick road,” a third researcher chimed.

“Are you kidding me? This is crazy,” an additional voice exclaimed.

Only about 3% of the 583,000 square miles within the Papahānaumokuākea Marine National Monument area has been recorded, although its peaks are known to rise over 16,000 feet from the seabed and summit just 200 feet below the surface of the water.

If the lost city of Atlantis were real, it would have fallen near the Strait of Gibraltar in the Mediterranean, according to Plato’s writings. Indeed, the legend of Atlantis dates back to Plato’s “Dialogues,  written about 360 B.C.—the first of all records of the lost city in history.

In the philosopher’s tale, the city was a metaphor for the corruption of power, wealth, and industry. In other words, it was created strictly as a plot device—and not the stuff of prehistoric folklore. Moreover, there isn’t a trace of archaeologic or geologic evidence that a sunken city ever existed.

However, the scientists now believe, “What may look like a ‘yellow brick road’ to the mythical city of Atlantis is really an example of ancient active volcanic geology.”

What the team actually had seen was later identified as hyaloclastite, “a volcanic rock formed in high-energy eruptions where many rock fragments settle to the seabed,” they explained, while the “unique 90-degree fractures” that made it look like stone laid for a road are likely a result of “heating and cooling stress from multiple eruptions.”

The current mission, funded by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, set out to obtain a deeper understanding of how the northwestern Hawaiian Islands were formed.

Research contact: @nypost

Report: Putin to undergo cancer surgery, transfer power to ex-FSB chief

May 3, 2022

Russian President Vladimir Putin is set to undergo cancer surgery and temporarily hand over power to a hardline former federal police chief, according to a new report.

Putin will transfer control of Russia’s government to Nikolai Patrushev, head of the Russian federal police’s Security Council, while he is incapacitated during and after the procedure, according to a video from the mysterious Telegram channel, “General SVR,” on Saturday, April 30, reports The New York Post.

The channel—which is purportedly run by a former Russian Foreign Intelligence Service lieutenant general known by the pseudonym “Viktor Mikhailovich” — reported that Putin has been told by doctors that he must undergo an operation.

The anticipated surgery and recovery are expected to incapacitate Putin for “a short time,” according to the unconfirmed report.

Putin is unlikely to agree to hand over power for a longer period of time,” the narrator of the video states—adding that the control of the country will likely be in Patrushev’s hands for no more than two to three days. 

“I will say that this is the worst option,” the narrator adds. “Patrushev is an outright villain. He is no better than Vladimir Putin. Moreover, he is a more cunning, and I would say, more insidious person than Vladimir Putin. If he comes to power, Russians’ problems will only multiply.”

“Viktor Mikhailovich” ominously hinted that he and his allies “will make certain efforts so this does not happen, and I hope we will succeed.”

\The video follows reporting from Russian investigative outlet The Project, which — in a sizeable report on the strongman’s vigorclaimed he has been seen by a cancer doctor 35 times in recent years. Indeed, an oncologist, identified by the outlet as Evgeny Selivanov, has reportedly made dozens of secret visits to Putin’s Sochi getaway home over just four years.

Putin has become so paranoid about his health, the outlet claimed, he has even turned to unconventional, and barbaric, therapies. Putin is said to bathe in the blood extracted from deer antlers, which are hacked off while they are growing and still full of fresh blood, the outlet said. The sickening “antler baths” are an alternative therapy in the Altai region of Russia, which borders Khazakstan and Mongolia.  Believers say the baths improve the cardiovascular system and rejuvenate the skin, The Project explained.

The report also suggests the Russian president secretly underwent surgery last autumn.“In medical circles, it is believed that the president was undergoing a complicated procedure related to some kind of thyroid disease during this period.”

Saturday’s video claimed that Putin’s cancer is progressing, but the narrator darkly quipped that he doesn’t want to give viewers “false hope.”

Putin, 70, whose sickly appearance and uncharacteristically fidgety behavior in public have recently raised questions about his health, has been rumored to suffer from cancer and a host of other serious maladies, including Parkinson’s disease.

His suspected health problems come at a particularly inopportune moment, with the war in Ukraine now in its fourth month and Russia suffering heavy losses on the battlefield.

In a Telegram post that appeared on Thursday, April 28, it was alleged that Patrushev had had a two-hour “heart-to-heart” conversation with Putin.

“We know that Putin signaled to Patrushev that he considers him to be practically his only trusted ally and friend in the government,” the post claimed. “Additionally, the president promised that if his health takes a turn for the worse, actual control of the country will temporarily pass into Patrushev’s hands.”

In early April, the authors behind the Telegram channel claimed that Putin’s doctors had recommended surgery for later that month, but that did not happen.

“General SVR” has been reporting on Putin’s supposed oncology diagnosis since at least November 2020—claiming that the Russian dictator suffers from bowel cancer.

New questions were raised about Putin’s physical state last month when he was seen tightly gripping a desk during his meeting with Defense Minister Sergei Shoigu.

The Kremlin has consistently denied that Putin suffers from any medical problems

Research contact: @nypost

‘Masked Singer’ judges walk off in protest after Rudy Giuliani appears

February 4, 2022

The newest season of Fox’s “The Masked Singer” hasn’t even aired—yet the reality show already has caused a stir with a shocking unmasking during the taping of the first episode, reports the New York Post.

Rudy Giuliani—whose most celebrated prior roles include two stints as New York City’s mayor (1994-2001) and a high-profile gig as the former president’s personal attorney—was revealed to be one of the first contestants to depart during the upcoming Season 7 premiere; prompting two of the show’s judges, Ken Jeong and Robin Thicke, to storm off the stage in protestDeadline first reported.

However, while Jeong and Thicke hit the exit, the two other judges, Jenny McCarthy and Nicole Scherzinger, stayed put and chatted with Giuliani after he took his clown mask off. Deadline did not disclose the song that sent him home early.

The new season is set to premiere on March 9.

The popular singing competition has been known to wow the judges, fans, and even hosts with its dramatic celebrity unmaskings. During Season 3, host Nick Cannon couldn’t believe his eyes when Sarah Palin was famously revealed as the Bear.

“This might be the most shocked I’ve ever been on this show,” he had said.

Research contact: @nypost

Brian Williams turns down CBS News’ attempt to recruit him for the ‘Evening News’

January 26, 2022

Brian Williams doesn’t want to anchor the CBS Evening News, reports CNN.

Just years ago, in 2015, the notion that Williams would be rebuffing an offer to helm one of the big three nightly news programs would have been unfathomable, the news source says. His reputation was in ruins for embellishing his stories as a journalist. He was booted from NBC Nightly News and accepted what was then a significant demotion to MSNBC.

But the tide has since turned.

Williams, who hosted the popular 11th Hour program on MSNBC during the Trump era, has largely rehabilitated his image. Now, he is in demand. And after departing NBC when his contract expired late last year, he’s a free agent for the first time in decades. That free agent status has translated into Williams fielding proposals.

One such proposal floated to him, according to three people familiar with the matter, was to anchor the CBS Evening News. According to the sources CNN spoke with, CBS News president and co-head Neeraj Khemlani recently tried to recruit Williams for the network’s flagship evening news program. Two of the sources said that Khemlani, who assumed his role less than a year ago and has been working to poach talent, tried at least twice. But it was to no avail.

Williams, the sources noted, simply isn’t interested in the evening news job—which says a lot about not only Williams’ turn-of-fortune, but also the diminishing allure of anchoring a nightly broadcast news program, once considered to be one of the most prestigious positions in journalism.

The revelation that CBS execs attempted to recruit Williams for the “Evening News” doesn’t look all too great for Norah O’Donnell, who has anchored the show since 2019 and has been unable to move the program out of its third-place position.

Publicly, the network has supported O’Donnell. When the New York Post reported in October that she was in danger of losing her anchor spot, Khemlani went on the record to the tabloid and praised O’Donnell. And on Monday, when asked about whether she will stay in the anchor chair, Khemlani lauded her ratings and said that CBS has “no current plans to change” what it is doing.

But, according to CNN, all of this begs the question: If CBS is so happy with O’Donnell, whose current contract is said to be up soon, why have they shopped her job to others?

“CBS News is overhauling its streaming news channel with a new name and a slate of programs presented by its big-name anchors that taps into the division’s legacy,” the Los Angeles Times’ Steve Battaglio wrote Monday. “The ViacomCBS unit is announcing today that the free ad-supported channel, known as CBSN since its launch in 2014, will become CBS News Streaming. It will integrate the division’s broadcast franchises into the channel—a shift in strategy, as it previously relied heavily on a cadre of lesser-known anchors.”

Two of those anchors are O’Donnell and Gayle King. “Khemlani would not comment on the contract status of King and O’Donnell, whose deals are up this year,” wrote Battaglio, who interviewed Khemlani for his story. “Their futures have been the subject of TV news industry speculation. Including them in an announcement for two high-profile shows suggests they likely will remain at the network.”

Khemlani is quoted  by Battaglio, “I will tell you that Gayle and Norah and Tony Dokoupil—and anchors and reporters across the board—are showing enormous leadership in terms of contribution to the service, and they are the pace cars for the entire division,” “We’re thrilled we can tap into people of that caliber and not have separate teams across the board…”

Research contact: @CNN

Forever young? Jeff Bezos is backing anti-aging startup Altos Labs

September 8, 2021

Amazon and Blue Origin founder Jeff Bezos is pushing the envelope—on marketing, on suborbital space travel, and now on longevity. He is among a group of investors backing a new anti-aging company, according to a new report obtained by Fox News.

The company, Silicon Valley-based Altos Labs, is working on biological reprogramming technology that is targeted at essentially prolong human life, according to MIT Tech Review.

A Russian-born billionaire tech investor, Yuri Milner, and his wife, Julia, also have invested in the company, according to the report. Milner—who is known for investing in companies such as Facebook, Twitter, Spotify and Airbnb—is worth about $4.8 billion, according to Forbes’ estimates.

Altos was incorporated earlier this year in the United States and the United Kingdom; and has plans to create institutes in California, Cambridge, and Japan, according to the report obtained by Fox News.  

It’s also reportedly seeking university scientists with deep pockets dedicated to researching how to reverse the process of aging cells.

Bezos’ investment office, Bezos Expeditions, did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

However, this isn’t the first time the world’s richest man has invested in this kind of research.  The 57-year-old Bezos has also invested in the startup company Unity Biotechnology, the New York Post reported.

Unity, according to its website, is working to develop a “new class of therapeutics to slow, halt, or reverse diseases of aging.”

Representatives for Unity did not immediately respond to Fox News’ request for comment.

Research contact: @FoxNews

‘Cold case’: FTC said to be investigating McDonald’s broken McFlurry machines

September 6, 2021

The feds have had it with McDonald’s broken McFlurry machines, reports the New York Post.

The Federal Trade Commission is said to be investigating why the burger chain’s ice cream machines break down so often—a matter that’s become the butt of late-night TV jokes and viral social media posts.

The FTC contacted McDonald’s franchise owners this summer seeking information on what the problem is with the chain’s ice cream machines, The Wall Street Journal reported on Wednesday, September 1—citing a letter from the FTC and sources familiar with the matter.

When reached for comment by The Post, representatives for the FTC declined to comment.

The broken machines have drawn the ire of franchisees, who say it leaves them unable to serve milkshakes, soft cones; and the preeminent McFlurry, a cup of ice cream blended with candy and cookies.

The machines require a nightly automated heat-cleaning cycle that can take up to four hours, the Journal reported; and the cleaning cycle can fail, which makes the machines unusable until a repair technician can fix them.

The dysfunctional machines make treats that account for about 60% of the chain’s dessert sales in the United States, the Journal reported, citing a consumer survey by research firm Technomic.

And the repeated breakdowns rub customers the wrong way, spurring some to even pen petitions calling for action.

We are tired of being the butt of late night jokes. So are our customers and crews,” The National Owners Association, a group of franchisees, said in a May message to owners, according to the Journal.

Some franchise owners aren’t waiting for the corporate bosses to do something. Instead, they’re reportedly paying on their own to train staff on how to fix the machines.

Others have reached out to the machine’s manufacturer, Taylor Commercial Foodservice, which says the machines, themselves, are fine.

“A lot of what’s been broadcasted can be attributed to the lack of knowledge about the equipment and how they operate in the restaurants,” a Taylor representative told the Journal.

When working with dairy products, “you have to make sure the machine is cleaned properly. The machines are built up with a lot of interconnecting parts that have to operate in a complex environment and manner,” the representative added.

“There is no reason for us to purposely design our equipment to be confusing or hard to repair or hurt our operators.”

One startup, called Kytch, has tried to help franchisees address the problem by building a device that mounts on the ice cream machines and alerts owners about a breakdown through real-time text and email alerts.

The company told the Journal that its devices can prevent damage to the machines and help franchisees keep them running.

At one point, McDonald’s franchisees in 30 states used Kytch’s devices, the company told the Journal, but then McDonald’s told franchisees that the devices aren’t sanctioned and that they could pose a safety hazard, which Kytch denies.

“Nothing is more important to us than delivering on our high standards for food quality and safety,” the corporate parent reportedly said to franchisees, “which is why we work with fully vetted partners that can reliably provide safe solutions at scale.”

Kytch responded in May with a lawsuit that accused Taylor, a separate repair company authorized to work on the ice cream machines and a McDonald’s franchisee of conspiring to steal Kytch’s technology and replicate its device.

This is a case about corporate espionage and the extreme steps one manufacturer has taken to conceal and protect a multimillion-dollar repair racket,” attorneys for Kytch wrote in the complaint in California Superior Court in Alameda County. The case is pending.

But Taylor denied it had a copy of Kytch’s device or that it wanted to steal the startup’s technology.

“This is a case of a hacker—Kytch—incredibly accusing the hacked—Taylor—of theft,” lawyers for Taylor said in a court filing.

The Tennessee-based franchisee who was named in the suit also denied the allegations.

In an interview with the Journal, Kytch co-founder Jeremy O’Sullivan then accused Taylor of infringing on McDonald’s franchisees’ rights to alter and repair their ice cream machines.

Taylor responded by saying that owners are allowed to repair equipment as they see fit, but that the warranty on the machines isn’t valid if they fix them on their own, according to the Journal.

According to the Post, the FTC’s interest in the matter may stem from the Biden administration’s previously announced efforts to crack down on various manufacturers of products ranging from phones to farming equipment. Critics have alleged that major manufacturers of such products restrict customers from fixing the products themselves.

In July, Biden signed an executive order directing agencies to take the matter on, saying at the time in a fact sheet that Americans should be able to repair good they purchased on their own.

At the root of the FTC’s inquiry is how McDonald’s reviews suppliers and equipment, including the ice cream machines, and how often restaurant owners are allowed to work on their machines. The FTC inquiry is preliminary, and “the existence of a preliminary investigation does not indicate the FTC or its staff have found any wrongdoing,” the agency’s letter reportedly said.

In a statement, McDonald’s said it “has no reason to believe we are the focus of an FTC investigation.”

Research contact: @nypost

AOC not ruling out Senate challenge against Chuck Schumer in 2022

August 18, 2021

Representative. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-14th District, New York) is not ruling out challenging Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer (D-New York)— a 22-year Senate vet and stalwart member of the “moderate” wing of the Democratic Party — in a primary next year, reports the New York Post.

When the progressive “Democratic socialist,” who represents the Bronx and Queens, was asked by CNN’s Dana Bash if she is considering a campaign against her fellow New Yorker, AOC said she had not seriously considered it but also left the door open for a challenge.

“I know it drives everybody nuts. But the way that I really feel about this; and the way that I really approach my politics and my political career is that I do not look at things, and I do not set my course positionally,” she said in the late June interview that is set to air in full Monday night as part of CNN’s new series “Being …”

“And I know there’s a lot of people who do not believe that. But I really — I can’t operate the way that I operate and do the things that I do in politics while trying to be aspiring to other things or calculating to other things,” the 31-year-old progressive added.

Schumer, 70, who has represented New York state in the Senate since 1999, is up for re-election in 2022.

AOC defeated 10-term Democratic incumbent Representative Joe Crowley in a primary race in 2018 and went on to win the general election to represent the Empire State’s 14th Congressional District.

“For what it’s worth, Senator Schumer and I have been working very closely on a lot of legislation and that, to me, is important,” she told Bash. “And so, we shall see.”

In addition, the Post said, AOC has been asked before about a potential challenge to Schumer.

In January, she told Punchbowl News that she was “very much in a place where I’m trying to decide what is the most effective thing I can do to help our Congress, our [political] process, and our country actually address the issues of climate change, health care, wage inequality, etc.”

“I’m not playing coy or anything like that,” she added.

In her CNN interview, AOC also was asked about ambitions that go beyond the Senate, including a run for the White House. She said that looking that far into the future, at least for now, would compromise her ability to do her current job.

“I struggle with this because I don’t want little girls watching or anything like that to lower their sights or anything in that direction. But for me, I feel that if that was in the scope of my ambition, it would chip away at my courage today,” she said.

Research contact: @nypost

Andy Cohen seeks help in search for missing childhood friend who disappeared two weeks ago

June 7, 2021

Andy Cohen is asking for help finding a childhood friend who has been missing for two weeks, People magazine reports.

The Bravo star, 53, posted a missing person’s flier on Facebook after actor and playwright Andy Neiman disappeared from the MidHudson Regional Hospital in Poughkeepsie, New York, on May 21.

The poster says that Neiman, 48, is “a missing vulnerable adult” who has schizophrenia. He was last seen wearing green hospital scrubs and glasses. He is 5 feet 10 inches tall and weighs about 165 pounds.

Cohen and Neiman went to the same camp, as well as the same high school, he told The New York Post’s Page Six.

“I’m praying for his safe return, along with a lot of folks in St Louis,” Cohen said.

GoFundMe campaign to spread awareness about Neiman’s disappearance, describes him as a “brother, son, friend, and father.”

Loved ones write that Neiman “has a history of mental illness and may be suffering from psychosis.”

“While we believe Andy is still in the local area, family, friends, search parties and police have been looking for four days and have not yet located him,” his loved ones wrote, adding that they are raising funds to hire a private investigator for the case.

Neiman has a nine-year-old daughter. In addition to being a loving dad, he is a “wonderful, spiritual guy” his sister, Emily Abramson, told Page Six.

“He is incredibly quirky with deep passions for a variety of things, especially the performing arts and Shakespeare,” she said. “His mind is greatly analytical.”

She added, “One of his talents is transmuting his understanding of Shakespeare to people of every age.”

People magazine urges anyone with information on Neiman’s disappearance to call the New York Missing Persons Clearinghouse at 1-800-346-3543.

Research contact: @people

Tech bros move to create offshore ‘private cities,’ without U.S. government control

May 17, 2021

After dominating Silicon Valley for the past two decades—hiking up rent prices in the area and filling the streets with fleece vests and wool sneakers—techies now are spreading into other regions, such as Austin and North Carolina, reports The New York Post.

But merely setting up shop in a hot new spot just isn’t enough for some of the tech elite, who are formulating a plan to build their very own dream city—away from mainland America entirely and governed by themselves.

Twenty-five-year-olds Dryden Brown of New York University, and Charlie Callinan of Boston College, co-founded Bluebook Cities in 2019—described as a “society of pioneers settling the city of the future.”

Their goal: To be a“full-stack city builder,” which “partners with communities to develop beautiful, energetic, resident-owned cities,” the website states.  

So far, their community remains online, in “the cloud.” But they expect to enlist around 2,000 willing participants (about the size of a small college town) to pack up and move to their yet-to-be-built city. No word yet on where the concept will touch down, the Post says—but the two hope to land somewhere in the Mediterranean. 

Currently, Brown and Callinan are looking to partner with a country in the region that wants to attract a slice of Silicon Valley and is “down to forge a partnership with them,” Brown told YouTuber Justin Murphy in an interview.

They plan to negotiate a deal, “whereby they contribute land, perhaps for equity in the project and the terms will obviously be negotiated,” Brown explained. “We are not trying to be a total sovereign nation or something like that. We want to partner with a government and build something really cool that works with us and works for them and is mutually beneficial,” he said, adding that they want a government that will stop blocking people with “dumb regulations.”  

With the backing of angel investor Peter Thiel, who already has invested nearly $9 million in Pronomos Capital—a venture capital firm that focuses solely on startups like Bluebook Cities—the company is expected to soon morph the online community into a private city reality.

But membership is set to be even more limited than the already cost prohibitive Silicon Valley real-estate scene, the Post intimates: “Praxis applicants are carefully vetted with a written application and numerous phone calls with current members. New members are rare because membership is sacred,” the application states.

Their move follows the crippling pandemic, racial tensions and a controversial election — all of which have mounted talk of secession in what was once the tech capital of the world. The Silicon Valley techies are looking to take matters into their own hands by exploring ways to build an apolitical private city run by private residents without US government control.

“When COVID happened, the labor market migrated to the cloud. Now you can move sort of wherever you want and your job will follow—if you are a knowledge worker in many cases,” Brown told YouTuber Murphy via a video conference. “And I think this is going to create a shift in urban dynamics that’s greater than we have seen in 300 years, where people are no longer moving into cities for the labor market.” 

Brown and Callinan currently are building their online community via Praxis, which describes itself as “the society of pioneers founding the city of the future.” –The website conveys a sense of urgency, noting that Praxis is “racing to settle the first resident-owned Affinity City, developed by Bluebook Cities on the Mediterranean,” and explaining how the global reach of the Internet helps to build a community of “new cities organized around shared values and glorious visions for the future.”

One way to join the Praxis community is through the digital distribution platform Discord which is designed specifically to create a community among people with shared ideas and thoughts. “We want young and ambitious people who want to go out in the frontier and build the future.”

But the plan isn’t without its catches.

“If San Francisco gets radically better, or New York, and none of these people no longer want to leave,” Brown mused. “I think that is fairly unlikely but who knows? So there could be a demand problem.”

He also cited finance sourcing as a potential issue, describing how it would take at least $500 million for Phase 1 of building a city to come into fruition.

“You’re joining a startup city and you’re owning equity in the startup city by living there,” Brown concluded. “We intend for it to go to the moon. but we will see.”

Research contact: @nypost

BuzzFeed cuts loose 47 on HuffPost team

March 11, 2021

Just three weeks after finalizing a deal to buy HuffPost, Jonah Peretti’s BuzzFeed is taking a buzzsaw to the left-leaning news and culture site, the New York Post reports.

HuffPost reported that Peretti—who is chief executive, now that BuzzFeed has sealed the deal to buy the site co-founded  by Arianna Huffington is 2005— told staffers that the layoffs decision was made to “fast-track the path to profitability” for the money-losing website. The site’s losses totaled around $20 million in 2020, he said.

BuzzFeed on Tuesday said it made a series of cuts in HuffPost that will result in 47 U.S. jobs lost, including Executive Editor Hillary Frey and Executive Editor International Louise Roug.

The Canadian version of the website also will be shuttered.

The HuffPost union, organized as part of the Writers Guild of America-East, blasted the layoffs on Tuesday, March 9.

“Today, we learned that 33 of our colleagues—nearly 30% of our unit—will be laid off. We are devastated and infuriated, particularly after an exhausting year of covering a pandemic and working from home,” said the union. “This is also happening less than a month after HuffPost was acquired by BuzzFeed. We never got a fair shot to prove our worth.”

Former HuffPost owner Verizon recognized the union in 2016 and agreed to a new three-year contract in 2019, which remains in effect and will result in severance for the laid-off staffers, the union said.

BuzzFeed agreed in November to buy the site founded by Aianna Huffington, Peretti, Andrew Breitbart, and venture capitalist Kenneth Lerer.

Terms of the all-stock transaction between Verizon and BuzzFeed were not revealed, but Verizon maintained a minority stake in the site and has also pledged an investment into BuzzFeed as part of the deal.

Peretti will be CEO of the combined operations—but says he will run them as “separate distinct news organizations.”

“We want to ensure the homepage remains a top destination on the internet,” Peretti reportedly told staffers. “We also want to maintain high traffic, preserve your most powerful journalism, lean more deeply into politics and breaking news, and build a stronger business for affiliate revenue and shopping content.”

BuzzFeed made deep staff cuts at the start of the pandemic, but he said it had returned to profitability.

According to the Post, Mark Schoofs, the editor-in-chief of BuzzFeed, is seeking a new-editor-in chief at HuffPost, who will report to him. The post has been vacant for a year since Lydia Polgreen jumped to Spotify’s podcasting unit Gimlet Media in March 2020. Frey had been overseeing it since then.

Research contact: @nypost