Posts tagged with "Fox News"

January 6 Committee returns with another public hearing on Wednesday, September 28

September 27, 2022

“If he is the nominee, I won’t be a Republican.” That’s how Wyoming GOP Representative Liz Cheney framed the danger of another Donald Trump presidency—vowing on Saturday, “I’m going to do everything I can to make sure he is not the nominee,” should he run again,” reports CNN.

Her pointed comments come ahead of what’s likely to be the final public hearing from the House select committee investigating January 6, 2021, before it releases its final report.

The 1 p.m. (EDT) start time on Wednesday is perhaps more calculated than meets the eye. Discussing the timing on CNN Sunday, Democratic Representative Zoe Lofgren noted, “In the past, Fox News does play our hearings if the hearing is in the daytime.”

“So that’s a factor in reaching an audience that is not watching CNN,” the California Democrat added.

As Cheney’s fate last month showed, the committee is up against the clock. Neither she nor Illinois Representative Adam Kinzinger—the only two Republicans on the panel—will be returning to Congress next year, when a possible House GOP majority could look much different

What will the committee present this week? Panel members are keeping this close to the chest.

“I think it’ll be potentially more sweeping than some of the other hearings, but it too will be in a very thematic—it will tell the story about a key element of Donald Trump’s plot to overturn the election,” Democratic Representative Adam Schiff of California told CNN’s Jake Tapper on “State of the Union” Sunday.

The chairman of the committee, Democratic Representative Bennie Thompson of Mississippi, said last week, “We have substantial footage of what occurred that we haven’t used.”

Thompson also said there was “significant witness testimony that we haven’t used in other hearings,” calling it “an opportunity” to get it in front of the American people.

And, while Cheney said on Saturday she believes former Vice President Mike Pence has an “obligation” to speak with the committee, Lofgren was pessimistic on Sunday that the committee would hear from either the former President or former vice president.

“The vice president had said publicly that he thought he might want to come in, and so we were very encouraged by that. But since that time, his people have walked it back,” Lofgren said on CNN.

“And to be honest, given that select committees of this Congress—not just this select committee but all the select committees—exist only for the life of the Congress, if we were trying to get into a subpoena fight with either the former vice president or the former president, that litigation could not be concluded during the life of this Congress.”

One person who may be showing up for an interview in the coming weeks, though? Ginni Thomas. The House committee has come to an agreement with the conservative activist and wife of Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas, CNN first reported last week.

Research contact: @CNN

Judge grants Trump’s request for special master to review Mar-A-Lago documents

September 6, 2022

A federal judge will appoint a special master to sift through nearly 13,000 documents and items that the FBI seized on August 8 from Donald Trump’s Florida residence and club, Mar-a-Lago, and identify any that may be protected by attorney-client or executive privilege, according to a court order posted on Monday, September 5, reports The Washington Post.

U.S. District Judge Aileen M. Cannon—who was nominated by Trump in 2020—wrote in her decision that the Justice Department cannot continue reviewing the materials seized by the FBI at Mar-a-Lago or use them in its criminal investigation until the special master concludes his or her assessment.

But Cannon ruled that the Office of the Director of National Intelligence would be allowed to continue its ongoing assessment of the possible risk to national security posed by the removal from government custody of classified documents, some of them related to highly sensitive government and intelligence secrets.

In her opinion, Cannon sided with Trump’s legal team and said that the former president does retain some executive privileges after leaving office—a stance that the Justice Department disagrees with.

“The Court hereby authorizes the appointment of a special master to review the seized property for personal items and documents and potentially privileged material subject to claims of attorney-client and/or executive privilege,” the ruling states.

Justice Department spokesperson Anthony Coley said the government “is examining the opinion and will consider appropriate next steps in the ongoing litigation.” A representative for Trump immediately returned requests for comment on the ruling.

Trump’s lawyers have argued that an objective outside expert should review the thousands of White House and government documents that were kept at Mar-a-Lago despite months of efforts by the National Archives and Records Administration, and the Justice Department, to get them back.

In addition to identifying whether any of the documents should be shielded from prosecutors because of attorney-client or executive privilege, lawyers for the 45th president said, such a review would boost “trust” in the ongoing criminal investigation over the possible mishandling of classified documents after Trump left the White House.

Trump and his lawyers and allies have accused the Justice Department of having political motives in conducting the investigation and of unnecessarily escalating it into a criminal probe.

Attorney General Merrick Garland has declined to discuss the ongoing investigation, in keeping with general Justice Department practice. But he said days after the August 8 search of Mar-a-Lago that “Upholding the rule of law means applying the law evenly without fear or favor. Under my watch, that is precisely what the Justice Department is doing.”

While the FBI raid of Trump’s Florida residence and private club has triggered an outpouring of condemnation from the former president and his Republican allies, some Republicans have said the search may have been necessary.

In an interview that aired Friday, former Trump attorney general William P. Barr said there is no reason classified documents should have been at Mar-a-Lago after Trump was no longer president.

People say this was unprecedented,” Barr said in an interview with Fox News. “But it’s also unprecedented for a president to take all this classified information and put them in a country club, okay?”

In opposing the appointment of a special master, Justice Department lawyers told Cannon they had already sorted through the documents, using a “filter team” to separate out more than 500 pages of potentially privileged documents. That arrangement was approved by a U.S. magistrate judge who authorized the Mar-a-Lago search warrant.

Prosecutors said appointing a special master would be pointless, given the previous filter team review—but Cannon disagreed. They also said that there was no legal basis to appoint a special master in this case and that Trump had no rights to possess White House documents once he left office.

On Friday, September 2, Cannon unsealed a detailed inventory list of items seized from Mar-A-Lago. It showed that Trump intermingled classified and unclassified materials in boxes at Mar-A-Lago and had dozens of empty folders that bore a “classification” marking.

Research contact: @washingtonpost

Trump’s legal team scrambles to find an argument

August 30, 2022

On May 25, one of former President Donald Trump’s lawyers sent a letter to a top Justice Department official, laying out the argument that his client had done nothing illegal by holding onto a trove of government materials when he left the White House, reports The New York Times.

The letter, from M. Evan Corcoran, a former federal prosecutor, represented Trump’s initial defense against the investigation into the presence of highly classified documents in unsecured locations at his members-only club and residence, Mar-a-Lago.

According to the Times, “It amounted to a three-page hodgepodge of contested legal theories, including … Corcoran’s assertion that Trump possessed a nearly boundless right as president to declassify materials and an argument that one law governing the handling of classified documents does not apply to a president.”

Corcoran asked the Justice Department to present the letter as “exculpatory” information to the grand jury investigating the case.

Government lawyers found it deeply puzzling. They included it in the affidavit submitted to a federal magistrate in Florida in their request for the search warrant they later used to recover even more classified materials at Mar-a-Lago—to demonstrate their willingness to acknowledge Corcoran’s arguments, a person with knowledge of the decision said.

As the partial release of the search warrant affidavit on May 26—including the May 25 letter—illustrated, Trump is going into the battle over the documents with a hastily assembled team. The lawyers have offered up a variety of arguments on his behalf that have yet to do much to fend off a Justice Department that has adopted a determined, focused, and, so far, largely successful legal approach.

“He needs a quarterback who’s a real lawyer,” said David I. Schoen, a lawyer who defended Trump in his second Senate impeachment trial.  Schoen called it “an honor” to represent Trump, but said it was problematic to keep lawyers “rotating in and out.”

Often tinged with Trump’s own bombast and sometimes conflating his powers as president with his role as a private citizen, the legal arguments put forth by his team sometimes strike lawyers not involved in the case as more about setting a political narrative than about dealing with the possibility of a federal prosecution.

“There seems to be a huge disconnect between what’s actually happening—a real live court case surrounding a real live investigation—and what they’re actually doing, which is treating it like they’ve treated everything else, recklessly and thoughtlessly,” Chuck Rosenberg, a former U.S. attorney and FBI official, told the Times regarding Trump’s approach. “And for an average defendant on an average case, that would be a disaster.”

Trump’s team has had a few small procedural wins. On Saturday, a federal judge in Florida signaled that she was inclined to support Trump’s request for a special master to review the material seized by the government in the search of Mar-a-Lago on August 8.

It is not clear how much the appointment of a special master would slow or complicate the government’s review of the material. Trump’s team has suggested that it would be a first step toward challenging the validity of the search warrant; but it also gives the Justice Department, which is expected to respond this week, an opportunity to air new details in public through their legal filings.

Some of the Trump lawyers’ efforts have also appeared ineffective or misdirected. Corcoran, in his May 25 letter, made much of Trump’s powers to declassify material as president, and cited a specific law on the handling of classified material that he said did not apply to a president. The search warrant, however, said federal agents would be seeking evidence of three potential crimes, none of which relied on the classification status of the documents found at Mar-a-Lago; the law on the handling of classified material cited by Corcoran in the letter was not among them.

According to the Times, two lawyers who are working with Trump on the documents case—Corcoran and Jim Trusty—have prosecutorial experience with the federal government. But the team was put together quickly.

Trusty was hired after Trump saw him on television, people close to the former president have said. Corcoran came in during the spring, introduced by another Trump adviser during a conference call in which Corcoran made clear he was willing to take on a case that many of Trump’s other advisers were seeking to avoid, people briefed on the discussion said.

Trump’s allies have reached out to several other lawyers, but have repeatedly been turned down.

Corcoran, in particular, has raised eyebrows within the Justice Department for his statements to federal officials during the documents investigation. People briefed on the investigation say officials are uncertain whether Corcoran was intentionally evasive, or simply unaware of all the material still kept at Mar-a-Lago and found during the August 8 search by the FBI.

Corcoran did not respond to a request for comment. Taylor Budowich, a spokesman for Trump, said only that Trump and his legal team “continue to assert his rights and expose the Biden administration’s misuse of the Presidential Records Act, which governs all pertinent facts, has been complied with and has no enforcement mechanism.”

Even before Corcoran joined the team, Trump’s legal filings in various cases read like campaign rally speeches that he had dictated to his lawyers. The former president has a history of approaching legal proceedings as if they are political conflicts, in which his best defense is the 74 million people who voted for him in the 2020 election.

Trump’s advisers continue to insist that he was cooperating before the search in returning the documents. They also have suggested that they were quick to respond to Justice Department concerns, citing what they described as a request in June that a stronger lock be placed on the door leading to the storage area where several boxes of presidential records had been kept.

Yet the unsealed affidavit showed a portion of a letter from a Justice Department lawyer sent to Trump’s lawyers that did not specify anything about a lock and read less like a request than a warning.

The classified documents taken from the White House “have not been handled in an appropriate manner or stored in an appropriate location,” the letter read. “Accordingly, we ask that the room at Mar-a-Lago where the documents had been stored be secured and that all of the boxes that were moved from the White House to Mar-a-Lago (along with any other items in that room) be preserved in that room in their current condition until further notice.”

During the August 8 search, the FBI found additional documents in that area and also on the floor of a closet in Trump’s office, people briefed on the matter said.

Trump and a small circle within his group of current advisers maintain that he was entitled to keep documents he took from the White House, or that he had already declassified them, or that they were packed up and moved by the General Services Administration — an assertion flatly denied by that federal agency.

Trump, people familiar with his thinking say, sees the attorney general, Merrick Garland, not as the federal government’s chief law enforcement officer, but merely as a political foe and someone with whom he can haggle with about how much anger exists over the situation.

Shortly before Garland announced that he was seeking to unseal the search warrant, an intermediary for Trump reached out to a Justice Department official to pass along a message that the former president wanted to negotiate, as if he were still a New York developer.

The message Trump wanted conveyed, according to a person familiar with the exchange, was: “The country is on fire. What can I do to reduce the heat?”

A Justice Department spokesman would not say if the message ever made it up to Garland; but the senior leadership was befuddled by the message and had no idea what Trump was trying to accomplish, according to an official.

Research contact: @nytimes

Snakes in the grass: Florida python hunt attracts 800 competitors, seeking thousands in prize money

August 9, 2022

So far, more than 800 competitors have signed on for the 2022 Florida Python Challenge in  the Florida Everglades, which began on Friday, August 5 and will continue through 5 p.m. (EDT) on August 15. The entrants are in search of invasive Burmese pythons, which they hope will bring them thousands of dollars in prize money, reports Fox News.

According to the National Park Service, Burmese pythons now are established in the park, due to accidental or intentional release of captive pet animals. Pythons eat many different kinds of animals, and studies show that pythons are probably the main reason that mammals have declined very sharply in number in Everglades National Park.

Even though pythons are large snakes, their coloring and behavior allow them to blend into the environment. Since they are so hard to find in the wild, estimating the number that reside in the park is nearly impossible. A female python can lay as many as 100 eggs a year.A

“This is significant because every python removed is one less invasive species preying on our native birds, mammals, and reptiles,” Florida First Lady Casey DeSantis told the Associated Press.

Since 2000, when the event began, more than 17,000 pythons have been removed from the Everglades ecosystem, according to a news release.

Cash prizes of up to $2,500 are available in both the professional and novice categories for those who remove the most pythons, officials said. There are additional prizes for the longest python in each category. Each python must be dead, with hunters facing disqualification if they kill them inhumanely or kill a native snake.

So far, the registered hunters represent 32 states and Canada. Registrations are being accepted throughout the competition. It costs $25 to register and participants also must  complete an online training course.

Research contact: @FoxNews

4,000 beagles rescued from Virginia breeding facility are in need of new homes

July 14, 2022

Thousands of beagles are being rescued from a dog breeding facility in Virginia—and they’re in need of new homes, reports Fox News.

The Humane Society of the United States announced on July 7 that about 4,000 beagles will be removed from Envigo, a medical contract breeding facility that has been accused of having unfit conditions.

Envigo’s facility in Cumberland, Virginia, was taken to court in 2021 after the USDA and other law enforcement agencies found multiple federal violations.

In a filed complaint with the U.S. District Court in the Western District of Virginiaadult and puppy beagles were said to be underfed, injured, and sick. The dogs were reportedly kept in small spaces where feces piled up.

The complaint also alleged that the dogs received inadequate medical care and were subject to painful medical science experiments. Court records stated that more than 300 puppies died at the facility between January and July of last year.

In June 2022, Envigo’s parent company, Inotiv, publicly announced it plans to shutter the facility.

The Humane Society says it worked with the United States Department of Justice to develop a transfer plan that will move the remaining beagles to adoption facilities around the country.

“At this time, we are connecting with our shelter and rescue partners and preparing to take on the monumental process of securing placement for these dogs,” the Humane Society wrote in a statement, on July 7.

“The transfer plan was jointly submitted to the Court for approval by Envigo, the Department of Justice, and the Humane Society of the United States,” the statement continued. “Now that the Court has approved the joint transfer plan, we and our partners are preparing to move quickly to place these beagles in loving homes.”

Homeward Trails Animal Rescue, a nonprofit animal welfare group in Fairfax Station, Virginia, is one local shelter that’s taking in some of the rescued beagles.

The group previously rescued 475 beagles from the facility.

This time around, Homeward Trails will facilitate the transfer of another 1,500 beagles to partner organizations. “We hope to start this process around July 19th,” Homeward Trails’ Executive Director Sue Bell wrote in an email to Fox News Digital.

Beagles are a hound group dog that’s said to be “friendly,” “curious” and “merry,” according to the American Kennel Club. The breed is a small one that can grow up to 15 inches in height and weigh up to 30 pounds. They have a 10- to 15-year life expectancy and tend to be affectionate with family and well-behaved with children and other dogs.

Melissa McWilliams, the chief development direcort of the Beagle Freedom Project—a nonprofit animal rescue organization headquartered in Valley Village, California, told Fox News Digital that the rescued beagles will require special care, much like other rescued lab animals.

“Even though these animals were liberated before they were sold to testing facilities, they still have trauma and behaviors that are foreign to many families opening up their homes to these animals,” McWilliams said. “For these purpose-bred beagles, they have never received a kind touch, nutritious food or even a treat, had an opportunity to play, or know what grass feels like.”

She continued, “These beagles can be extremely fearful, especially in the first few weeks outside the breeding facility, which is overwhelming for many unprepared families because they require so much care and attention. Patience is the most important part of their healing process.”

McWilliams said potential foster and adoptive families will need to put in extra time for potty training, socializing (with humans and dogs), finding the right dog food, securing their home, and staying up to date on veterinary care.

Beagle Freedom Project has created a Care Guide for Envigo Beagles document that breaks down everything potential dog owners need to know about the special needs that lab dogs have.

Research contact: @FoxNews

Creepy dolls wash ashore on Texas coast

May 11, 2022

Creepy, nightmarish-looking dolls—sometimes covered in barnacles that grow out of their eyes—are washing up along Texas shorelines, according to researchers who survey the area for sea life, reports Fox News.

Where the dolls came from is a mystery, but the Mission-Aransas Reserve has been collecting the scary figures as they find them along a 40-mile stretch of coastline, Jace Tunnell, director of the reserve at the University of Texas Marine Science Institute, told the Fort Worth Star-Telegram.

Often, Fox says, researchers are surveying the coast for sea turtles and other marine mammals when they encounter the dolls on the beach.

“We’re actually doing scientific work, but the dolls are a perk,” Tunnell told McClatchy News last week.

Researchers comb the coastline—from North Padre Island up to Matagorda—twice per week, collecting debris of all kinds, including junk, in the process. “You never know what you’re going to find washing in. About twice a month we find these crazy-looking dolls that are washing in,” Tunnell said.

So far, the Reserve has collected about 30 dolls, Tunnell said in a Facebook video in October. Some are missing arms or legs—and others have algae growing inside the eyes and mouth as well as barnacles. Some have clearly been chewed on.

An image of each one gets posted on the group’s Facebook page, which has generated a substantial following since.

The first figure discovered by researchers was a sex doll. When Tunnell posted the image online, someone bought its head for $35, he said. The funds were donated to a sea turtle program.

Tunnel sells the dolls at a yearly fundraising auction. He’s not sure what the people who purchase the dolls do with them, he said.

“There’s a lot of nightmares out there,” he told the newspaper, referring to the debris.

Research contact: @FoxNews

Fatou, the world’s oldest gorilla, celebrates her 65th birthday with cake

April 15, 2022

The world’s oldest gorilla just turned 65 and Zoo Berlin pulled out all the stops to celebrate the life milestone achieved by Fatou—the western lowland gorilla that first arrived at its facility in 1959 at the age of two, reports Fox News.

Fatou’s age, however, is approximate since she arrived at Zoo Berlin “through strange circumstances” that involved a sailor trading her in exchange for a stay at a French inn.

The zoo celebrated Fatou’s 65th birthday with a “cozy coffee party” on Wednesday, April 13, and her handlers made sure to serve her a rice cake that had been decorated with fruit.

“Fatou is almost something of a living legend,” a spokesperson for Zoo Berlin wrote in an email to Fox News Digital, adding, “Not only in Berlin, but also beyond the borders of Europe, she has a large fan community that regularly enquires about the condition of the senior gorilla.”

Research contact: @FoxNews

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki plans to leave for an on-air role at MSNBC

April 4, 2022

White House Press Secretary Jen Psaki, is planning to leave her post to take an on-air role at MSNBC, a source familiar with the matter told CNBC on April 1.

Psaki, who is still fleshing out details with the company, is expected to leave the White House around May, Axios reported earlier Friday.

Psaki will host a show for NBCUniversal’s streaming platform, Peacock, Axios reported. She had reportedly also been in talks with CNN and other networks.

Psaki did not immediately respond to CNBC’s request for comment.

“We don’t have anything to confirm about Jen’s length of planned service or any consideration about future plans,” a White House official told CNBC in an email. “Jen is here and working hard every day on behalf of the president to get you the answers to the questions that you have, and that’s where her focus is.”

News networks have long looked to recruit spokespeople and other high-profile Beltway figures for their day-to-day political coverage, both as anchors and regular contributors.

Longtime ABC News host George Stephanopoulos, for instance, was formerly the White House communications director under President Bill Clinton. MSNBC political analyst and host Nicolle Wallace was a senior spokesperson for the George W. Bush administration and a spokesperson for John McCain’s 2008 presidential campaign.

Last March, former President Donald Trump’s final Press secretary, Kayleigh McEnany, joined Fox News as a commentator. More recently, CBS News signed ex-Trump official Mick Mulvaney as a paid contributor.

Research contact: @CNBC

January 6 panel zeroes in on Fox News’ Hannity; releases texts between host and White House

January 6, 2022

Fox News host Sean Hannity was concerned about former President Donald Trump‘s strategy and conduct before, during, and after the January 6 attack on the US Capitol, according to a letter sent to him on Tuesday, January 4, by the House select committee probing the insurrection, reports CNN.

The committee asked Hannity for his voluntary cooperation with its investigation  as a patriotic American—noting it had received “dozens” of his text messages sent to and from former Trump White House Chief of Staff Mark Meadows that indicate that he had “advance knowledge regarding President Trump’s and his legal team’s planning for January 6th.”

In the letter, the panel said it wants to speak with Hannity specifically about his communications with Trump, White House staff, and his legal team between December 31, 2020, and January 20, 2021, when President Joe Biden was inaugurated.

Hannity’s attorney, Jay Sekulow, told CNN, “We are reviewing the committee’s letter and will respond as appropriate.”

The committee said it has text messages from Hannity pushing back on the plan to urge Congress to challenge the certification of the election on January 6—and urging Trump to prepare for his departure from office.

On January 5, Hannity wrote that he was “very worried about the next 48 hours.”

In its letter the committee asked Hannity, “With the counting of the electoral votes scheduled for January 6th at 1 p.m., why were you concerned about the next 48 hours?”

The committee also cited a separate December 31, 2020, exchange in which Hannity wrote to Meadows, “We can’t lose the entire WH counsel’s office. I do not see January 6 happening the way he is being told. After the 6th. [sic] He should announce will lead the nationwide effort to reform voting integrity. Go to Fl and watch Joe mess up daily. Stay engaged. When he speaks people will listen.”

The committee said it appeared that Hannity has “detailed knowledge regarding President Trump’s state of mind,” and engaged with the former President numerous times. The committee noted that Hannity spoke directly with Trump on January 5 about “his planning for January 6th” and on January 10, when Hannity “may have raised a number of specific concerns about his possible actions in the days before the January 20th inaugural.”

The committee referenced messages from January 10 that Hannity sent to Meadows and Ohio Republican Representative Jim Jordan: “Guys, we have a clear path to land the plane in 9 days. He can’t mention the election again. Ever. I did not have a good call with him today. And worse, I’m not sure what is left to do or say, and I don’t like not knowing if it’s truly understood. Ideas?”

Trump told CNN in a statement Tuesday evening, “I disagree with Sean on that statement and the facts are proving me right.”

In a text to Meadows on January 5, Hannity wrote that he was “very worried about the next 48 hours” and referred to then-Vice President Mike Pence, who oversaw the certification of the 2020 election, saying: “Pence Pressure. WH counsel will leave.”

And on January 6, Hannity urged Meadows to tell Trump he should “ask people to peacefully leave the [C]apit[o]l.”

Before sending its letter, the committee revealed it had text messages from Hannity to Meadows on the day of the attack, calling for Trump to take action. According to the previously released text, Hannity said to Meadows: “Can he make a statement? Ask people to leave the Capitol?”

In its letter, the panel also made clear that it wants to learn more about the communications Hannity had as the riot was underway. “We are aware of and interested in your communications to Mr. Meadows and others during the violent attack on January 6th, as the rioters were attempting to occupy the Capitol building,” the letter reads, specifically referencing a text message sent to Meadows about “a potential effort by members of President Trump’s cabinet to remove him from office under the 25th Amendment.”

The committee made clear that its questions for Hannity are narrowly focused on those topics and do not address his public broadcasts.

Research contact: @CNN

Dominion Voting wins key decision in lawsuit against Fox News

December 20, 2021

A judge in Delaware has found that Fox News‘ coverage of election fraud after the 2020 election may have been inaccurate—and is allowing a major defamation case against the right-wing TV network to move forward, reports CNN.

Judge Eric Davis of the Delaware Superior Court declined to dismiss Dominion Voting Systems‘ lawsuit against Fox News in a significant ruling on Thursday, December 16.

The ruling will now allow Dominion to attempt to unearth extensive communications within Fox News as they gather evidence for the case, and the company may be able to interview the network’s top names under oath.

At this stage, CNN notes, the court must assume Dominion’s claims about Fox News are true. Still, Davis called out in the 52-page opinion that Fox News may have slanted its coverage to push election fraud, knowing the accusations were wrong.

Dominion alerted the network’s anchors and executives to information that disproved accusations of widespread vote-switching following Donald Trump’s re-election loss, the judge noted.

“Nevertheless, Fox and its news personnel continued to report Dominion purported connection to the election fraud claims without also reporting on Dominion’s emails … Given that Fox apparently refused to report contrary evidence, including evidence from the Department of Justice, the Complaint’s allegations support the reasonable inference that Fox intended to keep Dominion’s side of the story out of the narrative,” the judge wrote.

The court rejected Fox News’ claims that it was able to discuss Trump advisers’ election fraud conspiracies under principles of news reporting.

Fox News reacted to the ruling saying in a statement, “As we have maintained, FOX News, along with every single news organization across the country, vigorously covered the breaking news surrounding the unprecedented 2020 election, providing full context of every story with in-depth reporting and clear-cut analysis. We remain committed to defending against this baseless lawsuit and its all-out assault on the First Amendment.”

The lawsuit alleges Fox News personalities including Tucker Carlson, Jeanine Pirro, Sean Hannity and their on-air guests Rudy Giuliani, Sidney Powell and Mike Lindell spread lies about fraud in the 2020 election that hurt Dominion’s business. It is one of several lawsuits Dominion has brought related to right-wing claims after the election, and is a major win for the company.

The case will continue to move forward toward a final judgment, as both sides gather evidence. The judge still is considering whether Dominion can be considered a well-known entity, which could give Fox News some protection under the law.

Research contact: @CNN