Posts tagged with "Florida"

Judge dismisses Donald Trump’s lawsuit against Hillary Clinton

September 12, 2022

A federal judge in Florida has dismissed a sprawling lawsuit filed by former President Donald Trump earlier this year—calling the former president’s complaint a “political manifesto” rather than a viable lawsuit, reports The Wall Street Journal.

The suit had alleged that Hillary Clinton and other prominent Democrats illegally linked Trump to Russia.

In a written order issued late on Thursday, September 8, U.S. District Judge Donald Middlebrooks in West Palm Beach, Florida, said Trump’s various legal theories in the case, including racketeering and conspiracy, “are not only unsupported by any legal authority but plainly foreclosed by binding precedent.”

“Mr. Trump “is not attempting to seek redress for any legal harm; instead, he is seeking to flaunt a two-hundred-page political manifesto outlining his grievances against those that have opposed him, and this Court is not the appropriate forum,” Judge Middlebrooks wrote.

Alina Habba, a lawyer for Trump, said the former president’s team would immediately appeal the decision.

“We vehemently disagree with the opinion issued by the Court today. Not only is it rife with erroneous applications of the law; it disregards the numerous independent governmental investigations which substantiate our claim that the defendants conspired to falsely implicate our client and undermine the 2016 Presidential election,” she said in a statement.

Trump’s lawsuit, originally filed in March, alleged that Democrats tried to rig the 2016 presidential election by accusing him of colluding with Russia. The lawsuit sought compensatory and punitive damages of at least $24 million, asserting that Trump was “forced to incur expenses” including “defense costs, legal fees, and related expenses.”

The defendants in Trump’s lawsuit included former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton, former FBI Director James Comey, Representative Adam Schiff (D-California), and former British intelligence officer Christopher Steele, the author dossier leaked in early 2017 claiming that then-President-elect Trump had conspired with Russia to steer the U.S. election.

“In the run-up to the 2016 Presidential Election, Hillary Clinton and her cohorts orchestrated an unthinkable plot—one that shocks the conscience and is an affront to this nation’s democracy,” the complaint says. “Acting in concert, the Defendants maliciously conspired to weave a false narrative that their Republican opponent, Donald J. Trump, was colluding with a hostile foreign sovereignty.”

Clinton’s lawyers called the lawsuit a fundraising ploy.

“Whatever the utility of Plaintiff’s Complaint as a fundraising tool, a press release, or a list of political grievances, it has no merit as a lawsuit, and should be dismissed with prejudice,” Clinton’s lawyers said in a May court filing.

Special counsel Robert Mueller’s investigation found repeated contacts between Russia-linked entities and Trump campaign officials before the election, but did not establish that anyone affiliated with his campaign knowingly conspired with Russian efforts to interfere with the 2016 presidential campaign.

Research contact: @WSJ

Five GOP-led states extend unemployment aid to workers who have lost jobs over vaccine mandates

December 28, 2021

At least five Republican-led states have extended unemployment benefits to people who have forfeited their jobs because of their refusal to comply with vaccine mandates—and a smattering of others may soon follow, reports The Washington Post.

Workers who quit or are fired for cause—including for defying company policy — are generally ineligible for jobless benefits. But Arkansas, Florida, Iowa, Kansas and Tennessee have carved out exceptions for those who won’t submit to the multi-shot coronavirus vaccine regimens that many companies now require.

 Similar ideas have been floated in Wyoming, Wisconsin and Missouri.

 Critics contend that these states are incentivizing people to skip shots that public health experts say offer the best line of defense against the coronavirus. Business leaders and industry groups have argued against the rule changes because, they say, companies would shoulder much of the costs. And the efforts are playing out as the Biden administration is pressing immunization rules for private companies and as coronavirus cases are surging again because of the fast-spreading omicron variant.

 Indeed, the Post notes, observers say it’s a mark of the politicization of the coronavirus—with fights flaring over business closures, mask mandates and mor —and how it has scrambled state politics and altered long-held positions. What’s more, it wasn’t long ago that two dozen Republican-led states moved to restrict unemployment aid to compel residents to return to the workforce and ease labor shortages.

 “These governors, who are using the unemployment insurance system in a moment of political theater to make a statement about the vaccine mandate, are the same folks who turned off unemployment benefits early for millions of workers over the summer,” said Rebecca Dixon, the executive director of the left-leaning National Employment Law Project. Arkansas, Iowa, Tennessee and Florida cut federal unemployment aid in June.

 But backers insist that Americans should be able to decide for themselves whether to get vaccinated. Kansas Senate President Ty Masterson (R) has broadly criticized vaccine mandates as ineffective and unfair, at one point tweeting: “Kansans have made it clear that they choose freedom over Faucism”—a play on the name of the nation’s leading infectious-disease expert, Anthony S. Fauci, whose masking and vaccination guidance during the pandemic has made him a target for the right.

 The rule change represents one among multiple state measures seeking to undermine President Joe Biden’s vaccine mandate, experts say. His vaccine-or-test requirement for businesses with at least 100 employees and a separate vaccine mandate for healthcare workers have been mired in legal challenges. The issue will get a hearing before the Supreme Court next month.

 It’s unclear how many workplaces mandate inoculations. A Kaiser Family Foundation survey from October found that about 25% of the respondents reported that their employers had a vaccination requirement.

 As of December, at least 2,640 of the nation’s 6,000 hospitals had some form of a vaccine requirement, according to data maintained by the American Hospital Association. That’s about 44%, up from about 41% in October.

Each state sets its own eligibility guidelines for unemployment benefits, but they generally are available to those who are out of work because of issues beyond their control, such as being laid off due to a drop in company revenue. That is why someone fired for violating corporate policy, which would include vaccination rules, would not normally qualify for aid.

 

Research contact: @washingtonpost

Capitol Police open offices in California, Florida to probe threats against members of Congress

July 7, 2021

The U.S. Capitol Police (USCP) announced on July 6 that the department is in the process of opening regional field offices in California and Florida to investigate threats to members of Congress, as part of enhanced security efforts in the wake of the Capitol insurrection last January 6, The Hill reports.

Capitol Police said in May that threats against members of Congress have more than doubled—increasing 107%— since last year.

“The USCP has enhanced our staffing within our Dignitary Protection Division as well as coordinated for enhanced security for Members of Congress outside of the National Capitol Region,” Acting USCP Chief Yogananda Pittman said in a statement.

She added, “The Department is also in the process of opening Regional Field Offices in California and Florida with additional regions in the near future to investigate threats to Members of Congress.”

“It has been six months since rioters attacked the United States Capitol and our brave police officers and law enforcement partners who fought valiantly to protect elected leaders and the democratic process,”  Pittman said.

“We will never forget USCP Officers Brian Sicknick and Howie Liebengood, who died after the attack, nor the sacrifices of the nearly 150 law enforcement officers who were injured,” Pittman added.

While more than 500 people have been arrested in connection with the attacks, the FBI is still searching for some 300 subjects, including those involved with placing pipe bombs at each party’s national headquarters.

The department said it has been working to implement recommendations from multiple Juary 6 reviews, including those from the Government Accountability Office, the Capitol Police Office of Inspector General, and a House panel.

The various reviews found that the force was operating with aging equipment, failed to follow up on intelligence or widely distribute information to officers, and sidelined the Architect of the Capitol, one of its board members, from assisting with security planning.

Now, the force is expanding wellness services, with an emphasis on psychological trauma and stress; enhancing member protection; increasing training; and enhancing critical incident response training.

According to The Hill, the department also has purchased new helmets and batons for its forces, as well as shields, which its watchdog previously found were improperly stored and damaged.

What’s more, Pittman announced, the Capitol Police will increase its intelligence sharing with officers. “Externally, USCP leadership has increased intelligence sharing and collaboration between all of our local, state, and federal law enforcement partners; as well increased our partnership within the intelligence community and Congressional stakeholders.”

Research contact: @thehill

Gerber reveals 2021 Spokesbaby and first-ever Chief Growing Officer

June 29, 2021

On June 28, baby food provider Gerber announced the winner of its 11th annual Photo Search, who will serve as the 2021 Gerber Spokesbaby, as well as an important and adorable honorary role on Gerber’s Executive Committee as Chief Growing Officer (CGO). 

Zane Kahin from Winter Park, Florida, captivated the judging panel with his cheerful attitude, infectious giggles, and playful smile.

As the latest Gerber Spokesbaby and first-ever CGO, Baby Zane represents every Gerber baby, and his family’s story of perseverance and hope serves as a reminder of what unites all parents and drives everyone at Gerber: the promise to do anything for baby.

“Zane is our little comedian – he loves to crack himself up and even wakes up laughing,” said Erin Kahin, Zane’s mother. “On February 3, 2021, our shining light Zane came into our lives – beating all odds. When I was diagnosed with breast cancer at 27 years old and a newly single woman, my doctors were unsure how the impact of chemotherapy, radiation, and a double mastectomy would impact my ability to have children. After getting married to my husband over a year ago, we surprisingly conceived naturally and had a near perfect pregnancy. Our family continues to enjoy every moment and look at life with appreciation and a sense of humor.”

Zane Kahin has been spreading joy and laughter ever since his birth. He laughs the hardest in his bouncer; enjoys taking in the world and bonding with his family dogs, Rexy (10) and Liv (3).

“Photo Search is a moment that brings families together in celebration year after year, and the Gerber family is delighted to welcome Zane as this year’s Gerber Spokesbaby and first-ever Chief Growing Officer,” said Mohini Joshi, VP of Marketing at Gerber, in a company press release. “By recognizing that every baby is a Gerber baby, we celebrate the diversity of families – whether that’s where we’re from, who our parents are or the circumstances in which baby came into the world.”

Launched in 2010, Photo Search was inspired by the countless photos received over the years from parents who see their little ones in Gerber’s iconic baby logo, which features the original Gerber baby, Ann Turner Cook. In honor of the program’s 11-year anniversary, this year’s Photo Search winner will not only serve as the 2021 Gerber Spokesbaby but will also receive the honorary title of Chief Growing Officer for the year.

As part of the 2021 Spokesbaby and CGO’s tenure, he will work together with Gerber to help the next generation of babies grow and thrive. He will have the opportunity to serve as official Chief Taste Tester to taste and review new baby food products, provide the Gerber executive team “advice” about what babies need for the future; and guest star as Gerber CEO for a day when he will help make exciting business decisions that foster company and every baby’s growth.

In addition to the opportunity to be featured on Gerber’s social media channels and marketing campaigns throughout the year, Zane and his family were awarded a $25,000 cash prize, free Gerber product for up to 1 year, and a CGO wardrobe valued at $1,000 provided by Gerber Childrenswear.

Additionally, a unique Gerber Childrenswear CGO Onesies bodysuit and t-shirt designed in Zane’s honor will be available for limited-time purchase from Gerber Childrenswear. For every purchase of this special product, Gerber Childrenswear will make a product donation of equal value to charitable organization, Delivering Good, in an effort to help babies thrive in their communities.

To learn more about Zane or purchase the limited-edition CGO Onesies bodysuit and t-shirt, visit https://www.gerber.com/photosearch2021.

Research contact: https://www.youtube.com/user/Gerber\

Proud Boys deny sending threatening emails to Democratic voters in multiple states

October 22, 2020

Law enforcement officials have been notified that voters in multiple states have received personalized emails purporting to be from the Proud Boys—a far-right, neo-fascist white supremacist group. The messaging is filled with intimidating threats aimed at Democrats, if they do not change their vote to Republican, The Hill reports.

CNN and The Washington Post first reported that voters in Pennsylvania, Arizona, Alaska, and Florida all said they received threatening emails warning them to vote for President Donald Trump in the upcoming election, adding that the mysterious sender claimed to have access to voter history and “will come after you” should they fail to vote for the president.

“You will vote for Trump on Election Day or we will come after you,” reads one email obtained by the Post,. Dozens were reportedly sent, including more than 180 to students, faculty and staff of the University of Florida, a school spokesperson told CNN.

Chris Krebs, the director of the U.S. Cybersecurity and Infrastructure Security Agency tweeted that the agency was “aware of threatening emails with misleading info about the secrecy of your vote.”

“This is what we mean by not falling for sensational and unverified claims. The last line of defense in election security is you—the American voter. So be prepared, be a smart consumer and sharer of information. Vote with confidence,” added Chris Krebs.

Elections officials in Alaska and Florida confirmed to CNN that they were aware of the emails, with Alaska’s Division of Elections telling the network that federal authorities had been alerted. Representatives with elections boards in Pennsylvania and Arizona did not immediately return The Hill’s requests for comment. A spokesperson for the FBI’s field office in Anchorage also did not immediately return a request for comment from the Post.

The leader of the Proud Boys, Enrique Tarrio, told USA Today and CNN in a statement that his group was not responsible for the emails, which appeared to have been sent from an email address affiliated with the group but may have been the result of spoofing software, one expert told CNN.

“No, it wasn’t us. The people [who sent the emails] used a spoofing email that pretended to be us,” Tarrio said. “Whoever did this should be in prison for a long time.”

“We have spoken to the FBI and are working with them. I hope whoever did this is arrested for voter intimidation and for maliciously impersonating our group,” he added.

Trump recently faced criticism after he demurred follow his prompting by Fox News’s Chris Wallace to disavow the group during the first presidential debate between him and Democratic presidential nominee Joe Biden.

“Stand back and stand by,” Trump said during the contentious debate.

Research contact: @thehil

Editor’s note: According to multiple sources, U.S. officials on Wednesday night accused Iran of targeting American voters with faked but menacing emails and warned that both Iran and Russia had obtained voter data that could be used to endanger the upcoming election.

 

Gallup: 66% of Americans still are ‘worried’ about COVID-19 exposure; 29% are ‘very worried’

June 18, 2020

While about one-third of Americans believe, if you can’t see it, you can’t catch it; the rest of us still are relying on face masks and hand sanitizer. In fact, about two-thirds of Americans continue to say they “are  worried” about being exposed to the coronavirus, as multiple states see a new spike in cases, according to a Gallup poll released Wednesday reveals, according to a report by The Hill.

Gallup found that 29% of respondents are “very worried” about exposure to the coronavirus, and 66% are either “somewhat” or “very” worried.

The proportion who are concerned about the coronavirus has risen since Gallup began asking the question in February, The Hill notes. That month, 36% of Americans said they were either somewhat or very worried about exposure—a figure that more than doubled in March; and has plateaued at somewhere between 63% and 67% since then.

Specifically, 37% of black respondents and 50% of Hispanics said they were “very” worried, compared to only 25% of white respondents. A number of studies have indicated that COVID-19 is impacting people of color at disproportionate rates across the country. 

And The Hill says, there are also partisan divides over how concerned Americans are, with 85% of Democrats saying they are at least somewhat worried that they or their family will come into contact with the virus, compared with 47% of Republicans and 66% of Independents.

There have been over 2.1 million confirmed coronavirus cases nationwide, and nearly 117,000 people have died.

The poll comes as several states across the country are seeing new spikes in coronavirus cases, throwing reopening plans into question. California, Texas, Arizona and Florida are among the states reporting the highest daily increases in case counts. In Texas, health authorities on Tuesday registered the state’s highest number of hospitalizations due to COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus.

The Trump Administration has sought to blame the rise in cases on the increasing number of tests, but experts say there has also been a rise in the percentage of tests that are coming back positive.

The Gallup poll surveyed 1,034 adults from May 28 to June 4.

Research contact: @thehill

A place in the sun: Naples, Florida, metro area tops U.S. in well-being for fourth year straight

April 19, 2019

There’s no place like home, especially if you live in Naples, Florida. For the fourth straight year, the Sunshine State’s Naples-Immokalee-Marco Island metro area has rated tops for “well-being” out of 156 communities nationwide, based on data collected in 2017 and 2018 as part of the Gallup National Health and Well-Being Index.

With a total well-being index score of 65.7, Naples is the ne plus ultra; followed by Salinas, California (64.5) ; Boulder, Colorado (64.5); Santa Rosa, California (64.2); and Ann Arbor, Michigan (also at 54.2).

Rounding out the top ten are Cape Coral-Fort Myers, Florida (63.8), Fort Collins, Colorado (63.8); Lancaster, Pennsylvania (63.7); North Port-Sarasota-Bradenton, Florida (63.6); and Ashville, North Carolina (63.6).

The Gallup National Health and Well-Being Index is calculated on a scale of 0 to 100, where 0 represents the lowest possible well-being and 100 represents the highest. The score for each metro area is based on how it stocks up within each of the five essential elements of wellbeing:

  • Career: Liking what you do each day and being motivated to achieve your goals;
  • Social: Having supportive relationships and love in your life;
  • Financial: Managing your economic life to reduce stress and increase security;
  • Community: Liking where you live, feeling safe, and having pride in your community; and
  • Physical: Enjoying good health and enough energy to get things done daily.

In most cases, a difference of 1.0 to 2.0 points in the Well-Being Index score of any two areas represents a statistically significant gap and consists of meaningful differences in at least some of the five elements of well-being. Each city reported is represented as the broader metropolitan statistical area, as defined by the federal government.

The Well-Being Index score for the Naples metro area, though remaining the highest nationwide, has slipped from 67.6 for 2016-2017 to 65.7 in 2017-2018, a drop that parallels a significant two-year decline in wellbeing nationally.

Each of the top five cities for 2017-2018 has frequented the list of the top 15 well-being cities numerous times in prior years.

Highlights for top-ranking cities in specific areas of well-being in 2017-2018 include:

  • Boulder, a longtime pacesetter nationally in physical well-being, was the top U.S. city for the second year in a row for this element. The state of California provided the second- and third-ranked metros: Salinas and Santa Rosa.
  • McAllen-Edinburg-Mission, Texas, topped the nation in career well-being, marking the fourth year in a row that the city has been among the highest five nationally.
  • Naples residents have the highest social well-being, edging out Montgomery, Alabama and fellow Floridian city, Ocala.
  • After Naples, the top metro areas in financial well-being are Ann Arbor, Michigan; and San Jose-Sunnyvale-Santa Clara, California.
  • Community well-being is highest in the Naples, Asheville, and Fort Collins (Colorado)metros

On the other end of the spectrum, the Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula metro—which garnered the third-lowest ranking in 2016-2017—had the lowest overall well-being nationally for the first time in 2017-2018; supplanting Fort Smith, Arkansas-Oklahoma and Canton-Massillon, Ohio, neither of which reached the minimum number of completed surveys required for reporting this period.

Scranton–Wilkes-Barre–Hazleton, Pennsylvania came in second lowest, its lowest rank ever measured; followed by Youngstown-Warren-Boardman, Ohio-Pennsylvania. The South Bend, Indiana-Michigan metro was among the lowest 15 cities for the second straight year.

The Gulfport-Biloxi-Pascagoula metro was among the lowest three areas for career, financial and physical wellbeing, while Tulsa (social and physical) and Rockford (community and physical) were each among the lowest three in two areas of wellbeing. New Orleans-Metairie, Louisiana, and Mobile, Alabama joined Gulfport with the lowest financial wellbeing.

Learn more about where your area fall on the list by consulting the Gallup National Health and Well-Being Index .

Research contact: @Gallup

Florida recount: Judge defeats efforts to ‘throw shade’ at 4,000 Sunshine State voters

November 16, 2018

Efforts in The Sunshine State to “throw some shade” on voters who sent their ballots through the mail—many of them, members of the military—or who cast their ballots provisionally, or with questionable signatures, were defeated by Judge Mark Walker of the U.S. District Court of Tallahassee on November 15, the Washington Post reported.

Deprive The decision to provide two more days to count at least 4,000 more ballots came hours ahead of the Thursday afternoon deadline for elections officials to complete a machine recount—against which President Donald Trump and Florida’s Republican candidates already had been chafing.

Indeed, Trump tweeted early on November 12 that the races should be called immediately: “The Florida Election should be called in favor of Rick Scott [running against Democratic incumbent Bill Nelson for the U.S. Senate] and Ron DeSantis [running against Tallahassee Democratic Mayor Andrew Gillum for Florida governor] in that large numbers of new ballots showed up out of nowhere, and many ballots are missing or forged. An honest vote count is no longer possible—ballots massively infected. Must go with Election Night!”

It was not clear how the judge’s decision would affect the timing of the recount, which was expected to move to a manual canvass today in the too-close-to-call Senate race, in which Scott leads Nelson by fewer than 13,000 votes (0.15 percentage points).

Unofficial results in the gubernatorial race showed Republican former Congressman Ron DeSantis leading Andrew Gillum by nearly 34,000 votes—or roughly 0.4 percentage points.

According to the Post, while the ruling gave Nelson an opportunity to close the numbers gap, it fell short of the more sweeping decision his lawyers sought. In a blow to the campaign, Judge Walker declined Nelson’s request to count all ballots with mismatched signatures, sight unseen.

But, in his ruling, Judge Walker was very clear about the “irreparable injury” that had been inflicted on the constitutional rights of citizens “to cast their ballots and have them counted.”

He noted, “the precise issue in this case is whether Florida’s law that allows county election officials to reject vote-by-mail and provisional ballots for mismatched signatures–with no standards, an illusory process to cure, and no process to challenge the rejection—passes constitutional muster. The answer is simple. It does not.”

Specifically, the Post reported, Judge Walker noted that while the deadline to submit a mail-in ballot was 7 p.m. Election Day, the deadline to “cure” a mismatched signature was 5 p.m. Monday, the day before — meaning those voters not notified, or notified too late, had no recourse.

In his ruling, Walker said the plaintiffs, the Florida Democratic Party and the Nelson campaign, had established “irreparable injury” to the constitutional right of citizens “to cast their ballots and have them counted.” Specifically, Walker noted that while the deadline to submit a mail-in ballot was 7 p.m. Election Day, the deadline to “cure” a mismatched signature was 5 p.m. Monday, the day before — meaning those voters not notified, or notified too late, had no recourse.

State law requires canvassing boards to notify voters “immediately” if they determine that a mail-in ballot contains a signature inconsistent with the one on file.

“Here, potentially thousands of voters have been deprived of the right to cast a legal vote — and have that vote counted — by an untrained canvassing board member based on an arbitrary determination that their respective signatures did not match,” wrote the judge “Such a violation of the right to vote cannot be undone.”

He concluded, “This Court … is NOT ordering county canvassing boards to count every mismatched vote, sight unseen. Rather, the county supervisors are directed to allow those voters who should have had an opportunity to cure their ballots in the first place to cure their votes-by-mail and provisional ballots now,” he wrote.

Marc Elias, Nelson’s lead recount attorney, praised the ruling. “We look forward to ensuring that those voters who cast lawful ballots have them counted,” he said in an email to the DC-based news outlet.

Scott’s campaign said it was appealing the decision. “We are confident we will prevail,” said campaign spokesperson Lauren Schenone in a statement.

As recounts continue, the Post pointed out that the stakes are high: The Florida Senate race will determine the size of the GOP’s majority in 2019 and shape the power structure in the nation’s largest swing state. Together, the two sides have racked up at least 10 lawsuits trying to gain a legal advantage in the recount.

Research contact: @WaPoSean

Pundits shift nine House races toward Democrats

November 6, 2018

The nonpartisan Cook Political Report shifted nine House races toward Democrats in a new forecast published on November 5—the day before the midterm elections—The Hill reported.

The changes predicted by Cook are as follows:

Three races — in Texas’s 6th and 10th Congressional Districts and in West Virginia’s 2nd — moved from solid Republican to likely Republican. Two other races—Florida’s 25th and 6th districts, went from likely Republican to leaning Republican.

The movement is the latest indication that Democrats still have the upper-hand in the House prior to Tuesday’s midterms, when Democrats need to pick up 23 seats to regain control of the lower chamber. 

Research contact: @thehill

Ingraham’s departed sponsors see little blowback, while fallout hits Fox

April 4, 2018

Early data show the Fox News Channel brand sustaining greater financial losses—as well as damage in consumer perception—than any advertiser currently boycotting host Laura Ingraham’s television show, according to findings of a YouGov BrandIndex released on April 2.

Since advertisers began pulling out of The Ingraham Angle following the host’s incendiary tweets on March 28 about Parkland, Florida, shooting survivor David Hogg, nine of them have seen negligible movement in their Buzz Scores. What’s more, several have improved in their ratings—as follows:

  1. Progressive (previous score as of March 29: 10.7/current score as of April 1: 11.7);
  2. Office Depots (8.1/8.9);
  3. TripAdvisor (7.4/8.1);
  4. Johnson & Johnson (6.0/6.4);
  5. Expedia (6.7/7.0);
  6. Liberty Mutual (11.1/11.1);
  7. Ruby Tuesday (5.9/5.6)
  8. Hulu (14.3/13.9)
  9. Jos A Bank (4.6/4.2);
  10. Fox News Channel (-3.4/-6.89)

Hogg had immediately listed the names of Ingraham’s sponsors on his own Twitter account after her tweeted taunts—urging activists to call the advertisers and tell them to stop doing business with the Fox bully.

Of all of the brands, Fox News Channel’s Buzz Score dipped the most during the first days following the advertisers’ exodus, with more consumers hearing negative things than positive—indicating that the network could suffer from the controversy.

What’s more, advertisers continued to decamp, even as the host announced that she would take a one-week vacation and tweeted her apologies to Hogg on March 29, in an effort to stop the bleeding.

A Fox spokesperson stated that Ingraham’s time off had been previously planned.

Research contact: ted.marzilli@yougov.com