Posts tagged with "Bella Hadid"

‘Expensive brunette’ is the brown hair trend you’ll be seeing everywhere this fall

November 8, 2021

A new spin on brown hair is here: expensive brunette, reports Glamour magazine.

“Expensive brunette is all about giving deeper hair energy, dimension, and detail,” says celebrity hairstylist Tom Smith, European creative director for Evo Hair.

He explains, “It’s all too easy when going for a darker shade of hair color to apply one tone all over, a similar result to using a box dye at home. I’m of the opinion that it’s professional hair colorists’ responsibility to give our clients something they could never get at home, and so expensive brunette is all about adding detail and interest with multiple deeper shades to make the result more dimensional and expensive looking.” 

Celebrities like model Bella Hadid have been making brown hair part of their look for years, but now we’re even seeing famous blondes, like Hailey Bieber, go darker.

Explains Smith, “In the celebrity world, it’s often ‘the bolder the better;’ hence, why so many celebrities are blonde—or choose obviously artificial shades for their own hair, or use wigs. Now that a brunette can look equally as ‘expensive’ and ‘designed’ as brighter or bolder shades, it makes sense that many celebrities are interested in the deeper tones.”

If you’re interested in trying out expensive brunette, Smith says, it’s important to use some specific language at the salon: “The key element to discuss with your hairstylist is that you don’t want one flat color all over. Expensive brunette is all about depth and dimension, and so you; and your colorist should agree on the deepest shade and the lightest shade you want to see in your hair, and then allow the colorist to place shades between in a way they see fit to enhance your hair cut.”

Smith continues, “It’s key to make sure your colorist knows you want to be seen as an ‘exciting brunette,’ not edging towards being seen as a blonde. It’s also worth discussing whether warmer or cooler tones suit your skin, as this decision can be taken independently of how light or dark you want to be. Warmer shades would present as coffee, caramel, copper, and gold, while cooler tones would present as iced chocolate, ash, taupe, silver, and ice.”

As far as products, Smith recommends Evo’s new hue-verse demi-permanent gloss for a low-commitment look. However, as always, check with your local experts to figure out what works for your budget, schedule, and texture.

Research contact: @glamourmag

Party hearty: Non-alcoholic ‘euphoric beverages’ claim to let you socially lubricate without booze

October 19, 2021

If you’re tired of turning to alcohol to loosen up while socializing, there is a new alternative: Euphoric beverages, like those from Kin Euphorics—co-founded by supermodel and activist Bella Hadid and Jen Batchelor—claim to be non-alcoholic drinks that can enhance your mood without getting you drunk.

Perhaps more importantly, they allow you to socially lubricate without giving you a hangover the next morning, reports Futurism.

Along with Kin Spritz, High Rhode, and Dream Light, the Kin Euphorics line of beverages now also includes  Kin Lightwave. The flavor of Kin Lightwave combines lavender-vanilla, birch, and smoked sea salts into what the company calls “a refreshing and tasty rainbow.”

Bu, the founders recently told Futurism , the flavor is far from the only reason to enjoy Lightwave. Its euphoric properties come from its active ingredients of Reishi Mushroom, Saffron, L-Tryptophan. While responses to Kin euphorics differ, some of the most commonly reported sensations include a sense of calm, clearer thinking, and better social connections.

The main ingredients all come down to adaptogens, nootropics, and botanics.

Reishi Mushroom and Passionflower are adaptogens that boost your adrenal system and give your body more balanced and healthy stress responses.

Lightwave’s nootropics are L-Theanine, L-Serine, L-Tryptophan, and Magnesium Glycinate— which come together to give your brain a much needed boost, the company claims.

Then, there are botanics like Lavender Extract, Cinnamon, Saffron, and Gentian Root, which, Kin Euphorics notes, give the beverage flavor and aroma as well as a feeling of calm and relaxation, plus a handy boost to your body’s immune system.

Inside each can of Kin Lightwave you’re likely to find a sense of calm, a boost to your brainpower, and better, clearer social interactions. That, plus its one-of-a-kind flavor, means you’ll probably want to enjoy one or two more. But Kin recommends you hold yourself to four cans of Lightwave at most in a 24-hour period.

If you’re interested in non-alcoholic Kin Lightwave, you can order a pack of eight cans for $30, or save a little by purchasing a 16-pack for $56. And you can save even more and have it shipped for free by going for a monthly subscription.

Research contact: @kineuphorics

Foxy ladies: A new eye makeup technique is trending—but critics insist it is racist

August 19, 2020

On Instagram, TikTok and YouTube, people from all over the world have been posting videos and photos modeling “the look”—using makeup and other tactics to emulate the lifted, so-called “almond-shaped” or “fox eyes” of celebrities such as Kendall Jenner, Bella Hadid, and Megan Fox.

Fox-eye makeup tutorials show how to use a combination of eye shadow, eyeliner, and fake eyelashes to get a winged aesthetic. Tips include shaving off the tail end of eyebrows and redrawing them to appear straighter and angled upwards. Others have suggested pulling hair back into a high ponytail or using tape to further lift the eyes.

Accentuating eyes to appear slanted, or elongated in shape, creates a more sultry effect, according to some makeup artists creating the look. But to Asian Americans, the “migraine pose” that sometimes accompanies these images— using one or two hands to pull the eyes up by the temples to exaggerate the result -—is far too similar to the action used to demean them in the past, CNN reports.

Indeed, they assert, it’s a form of cultural appropriation.

Kelly H. Chong, a Sociology professor at the University of Kansas, defines cultural appropriation as the adoption, often unacknowledged or inappropriate, of the ideas, practices, customs and cultural identity markers of one group by members of another group whom have greater privilege or power.

“The cultural influencers from the dominant group legitimize it as a cool style ‘trend,’ and in the process exoticize and eroticize it,” Chong added in an e-mail interview with CNN. Even the term “almond eyes,” she says, which is being used to describe the shape of fox eyes, has long been used to describe the shape of Asian eyes.

She points to Hollywood’s uncomfortable past in the appropriating the shape of Asian eyes. In the early 1930s, makeup artist Cecil Holland used techniques — some, similar to creating fox eyes today—to transform White actors into villainous Asian characters, like Fu Manchu. And Mickey Rooney, the White actor playing the part of Holly Golightly’s thickly-accented Japanese neighbor in Breakfast at Tiffany’s cemented “the buck-toothed, slit-eyed Asian man look” in the popular imagination.

TikTok user @LeahMelle, whose video denouncing the fox-eye look went viral, said she couldn’t believe that such a trend could be so popular nowadays: “This wasn’t some dated movie where you could blame the distorted norms of the time period. This was happening now. And it was still viewed as acceptable,” she wrote in an email.

Emma Chamberlain, an influencer with 9.8 million followers on Instagram, was criticized recently for posting a picture that showed her striking this pose while sticking out her tongue.

Her fans rushed to defend her—commenting that those who felt offended were “overreacting.” Chamberlain later deleted the picture and apologized, saying it wasn’t her “intention” to pose in an “insensitive way” and that she was “so sorry to those who were hurt by it.”

But the damage already had been done.

“They mock my eyes, then say ching chong; call me a dog eater and then call me a ch*nk. Like why would you think I’d be fine with Emma’s post?” one person tweeted. “Obviously if she gets to do slant eyes whilst getting praised but it’s my natural eye shape and I’m getting discriminated (of course) I’m mad.”

“It’s a new trend that brings out old stereotypes and old taunts,” Wang said in a phone interview with CNN. “Because it makes people like me feel uncomfortable and (to) some degree annoyed, it’s time to talk about it.”

Like most beauty trends, the craze for fox eyes will eventually subside, and has begun to already since it first came about earlier this year. But that’s exactly the problem, according to Stephanie Hu, founder of Dear Asian Youth, a California-based organization that encourages Asian activism.

In an Instagram post, entitled “The problem with the #FoxEye trend,” the organization wrote, “While it may not have originated from a place of ill-intent, it appropriates our eyes and is ignorant of past racism.”

“It really feels like this is a temporary trend,” Hu told CNN, adding that she believes Asians’ eye shapes aren’t just something to be casually adopted and then “given back” when the trend is over. “Our eyes are something that we have to live with every day,” Hu said in a phone interview.

Research contact: @CNN

Faint praise: How ‘flattering’ became fashion’s ultimate F-word

August 14, 2020

Faint praise: How ‘flattering’ became fashion’s ultimate F-word If you asked someone how your outfit looked, and they said, “Fine,” how would you feel? Not so great? But what if he or she looked you up and down and said, “Flattering”?

‘I’ve got loads of dresses that I bought because someone in the changing room told me they were flattering,” Billie Bhatia, the Fashion Features editor at Stylist magazine, recently told The Guardian in an interview. “In that moment, I feel lifted. My insecurities about my body are erased.”

But Bhatia, 30, has been having second thoughts about the word. “Occasionally, it means a great color that makes your skin glow, but most of the time ‘flattering’ is just a byword for ‘slimming’,” she said “If someone delivered the same compliment, but substituted the word ‘slimming’ for ‘flattering’, would you think that was an OK way to talk to a woman? No, right? Everyone likes to hear a compliment. But ‘flattering’ is a dangerous word.”

In 2017, the perfect pair of jeans was “on-trend”. In 2018, it was “fierce”; last year it was “extra”. Right now, it is “dripping”. In fashion, every season comes with a new form of shorthand. But one compliment—“flattering”—has outlived them all, selling more jeans, more party dresses, and more swimsuits than any other word.

“Flattering” is fashion clickbait, an add-to-basket dog whistle. Except when it’s not: For Generation Z—roughly speaking, those born between 1995 and 2010 –“flattering” is becoming a new F-word.

To compliment a woman on her “flattering” dress is passive-aggressive body-policing, sneaked into our consciousness in a Trojan horse of sisterly helpfulness, The Guardian notes.  It is a euphemism for fat-shaming, a sniper attack slyly targeting our hidden vulnerabilities. “Flattering”, in other words, is cancelled.

The British model Charli Howard, 29, has been a force for change in the fashion industry since 2015, when an angry Facebook post she wrote about her then-agency saying she was too big – she was a UK size 10/12 – went viral. “The issue with the word ‘flattering’,” says Howard, now an activist for model diversity and healthy body-image, “is that we instantly associate it with looking thin and therefore looking ‘better’. It suggests your tummy looks flatter or that your waist looks smaller. I find it’s a phrase older generations use. Girls I speak to from generation Z tend not to use it. Those girls see a diversity on social media that older generations didn’t. Celebrating your flaws is considered cool these days.”

“Magazines that I grew up with never went an issue without a ‘how to fix your body issues’ article,” Emma Davidson, 33, the Fashion Features editor at Dazed Digital, told The Guardian. “It was either about how to look slimmer or about ‘adding curves to a boyish body’. The message was that whatever you looked like, it wasn’t good enough.”

Until recently, Davidson said, “there were lots of things I didn’t wear because I thought I was ‘too big’. In the last few years, I’ve begun to accept and celebrate myself. The word ‘flattering’ is part of how fashion tells women that they are taking up too much space in the world. That’s just wrong on so many levels.”

It would be cheering to report that the word “flattering” is, therefore, being retired from active duty; phased out as society casts aside the cult of skinniness and learns to celebrate beauty in diverse shapes and sizes. The truth, sadly, is rather more complicated. With a few laudable exceptions – Eckhaus Latta’s all-sizes casting at New York Fashion Week, Vogue covers for plus-size models Ashley Graham and Paloma Elsesser—fashion’s bodily ideal remains stubbornly narrow. The pantheon of supermodels has yet to admit any woman over a size 8.

Kendall Jenner, Kaia Gerber and Bella Hadid—the most high-profile models of the moment—are as thin as or thinner than any era of cover girls before them. Every designer, every fashion retailer and every changing-room assistant will tell you that women always start with shape when shopping for clothes. “Flattering” is very much alive, and selling clothes.

What’s more, some women are protective of “flattering” as a practical shopping aid, a friendly word rather than a toxic one. “Flattering” can describe clothes that feel like they have been made with the real female body in mind, rather than clothes that have been conceived to promote an abstract concept of design, or a trend.

At the British label Me+Em, Clare Hornby, 51, and her female-led design team are proud to give their customers flattering clothes, The Guardian notes. “We listen to our customers first and then create a functional yet chic offering that speaks to their needs, rather than us telling them what they should be wearing simply because it’s ‘on-trend’,” says Hornby.

“A perfect example is our zip-front necklines: a lot of customers with larger bust sizes commented that they avoided button-up designs, so we came up with an alternative that means you can choose your own neckline – catering to lots of different shapes – but that also adds a contemporary, sports-luxe feel that speaks to our aesthetic. Turn-up cuffs on trousers and jackets, adjustable draw-cord waists, removable belts – all these intelligent design details are important, because there is no one cookie-cutter body shape.”

So, it seems that the disquiet around the word, “flattering,” isn’t about pretending that our body hang-ups have gone away, but about a rising consciousness of where those hang-ups come from. “Insecurities don’t just go away overnight,” says Davidson. “I have had a lot of unlearning to do.”

Research contact: @GuardianUS